(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Instructor"







^"^ 
















-,'^ , A 



' > *. 












J* 






( 






u;ji 



< it / 



•? 



■•at 












f 






h^.. 






ff1^ 






'"i: 



Bmi 






J<^ 






Xi\ 



•nui 



■fi% 






-r <^ 






'<• Jt^, 









T " ^ Instructor 



MAY 



19 6 7 






■■'g.>^>iaa ;>v'j 



,;''V;Ss:i^'3;'.'';;r 



«o 



6 

Z 



en 
o 



0) 

E 



K 
§ 



^ 

5 



(A 



O 

u 

O 



lA 
Ul 

in 





CO 



■II 

z 



HI 
lA 
B£ 

3 

8 

o 
o 

z 
u 

«A 

o 

z 






<a 










• 




n 


• 




s 




m 


« 




• 




« 




to 


S 


• 






• 


- 








< 


< 






< 


< 






mU 


-1 


< 


< 


< 




S 








< 






2g 








• 




• 




• 


• 


§1 

SI 




§ 

« 

ii 






• 


• 




• 


11 






• 








• 




i 


• 


i 






• 


• 












• 


• 




• 


i 






• 


h.2 






• 




r-8 


• 


s 
if 


I 


1 


• 


• 




1 




• 




• 


• 




• 




ig 




• 






II 


• 




5 


• 


iO 


11 




• 


• 






1 
IS. 






• 


• 




• 


In 






• 














• 


i 


1 




• 


• 


a 
1 










• 


• 


1 


• 








• 


§ 




1 


1 




1 


• 




5 

K 




• 


• 






E 

m 


• 




• 


• 


in 


• 








• 




1 

rs 




• 


• 




• 








• 


• 




i 

1 








• 


• 


1 


• 








• 








1 




1 


• 


• 






• 


• 


s 

K 


as 




if 




■ 


• 


1 


• 








• 


1 

K 


Is 


1 


• 


ft 

Is 

■ri 




• 








• 


• 


1 


ft 

i 








• 


• 


1 

CD 


• 






1 

s 


• 


§ 






1 






• 


s 

i 






• 


• 




• 


1 




• 


• 


• 




• 








• 






1 
1 


• 






• 


a 


I 
5 




• 


• 










• 


• 


• 




• 






1 


• 








• 


a 

5 




• 








• 


• 




a 


a 




• 


• 


• 




• 








• 




««». 




• 






• 








• 


• 










• 


• 


• 




• 






ts.— 


• 


11 


£ 




g 


oo 


1— ■ 




oo 




oo 


OO 

oo 




"S 


F— 




0* 


g 


0^ 


8 


1 


i 


§ 


1 


CM 


•su 

a 

£§ 

Z»T! 

gS 


Z u 

si 

Ul •'. 

to 
1 




111 U 

UJ lUl 


o fe 

<cS 
!" e 

2.1 

ii 

"■en 


-1 1) 

is 

if 

1 
1 

o 
< 


!»• 
il 

■^-^ 

lU CD 

-s 
-a 

a 

1 
1 

1 


il 

< g 

u. 

o 

lU 

u 

z 

111 

X 

1- 


h i 

il 

!=^ 

°l 
1 

.J3 


il 


S.2 
u u 

o 

'"I 

1 

■3 
S 

.S 


2S 

O-G 

< « 

Eft; 
> 

a 

lU 

5 


o ■* 

— aj 

< 


z§ 

< g 

1 

1 

1 
o 

1 


sis 

Z 

tU .M 

-a 

1 


5I 

X S 

c 
^- 

1 

1 

.0 


£■1 

il 

-C 

OS 

C 

e 
1 


< c 

0:2 

Ul 4^ 

|l 

■a: 


H 

a: a 

u 

3 ^ 



z 



Ik 


? 


< H) 

!i 

£^ 

I c 

^ 


"■S 

i* 

z2 

SKI 


S-5 

s£ 

£q 
■ >, 




zg 
o-a 

Q 3 

UJ ^ 
lU «i 


31 
SI 

.0 




Sis 



>- 
z 
o 



> CD a> tl> 




Pas 

^« 

S c P 



^ 



Q 

^ 



2 S 

i.s| 
ill 

5< 3 M 
0) S OJ 



■a 




•c 




(1) 








6 


S 


S 


g 






w 




t) 


tn 






•0 




a 






<L 




3 



I 

'(H nt CD 

ml 



rs 






Ul 

m 



OS 

to 
O 



3 




Nearly two thousand years ago Peter, the chief 
apostle, addressed the elders of the Church in that 
day. He said: 

.../... am also an elder, and a witness of the 
sufferings of Christ, and also a partaker of the glory 
that shall be revealed. 

Then he said to the elders, 

Feed the flock of God . . . being ensamples to 
the flock. 

Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the 
devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom 
he may devour: 

Whom resist stedfast in the faith, knowing that 
the same afflictions are accomplished in your breth- 
ren that are in the world. (7 Peter 5:1-3, 8-9.) 

These quotations give an insight into the troubles 
they had in that day. 



RESPONSIBILITY 

OF THE PRIESTHOOD 




'**» . iinJ(M*""*W<W^ 



Art by Dale Kilbourn. 



by President David 0. McKay 

A great responsibility rests upon the priesthood of 
this Church to teach the truths of the Gospel. 
The members should be aroused to the realization 
that the enemies of truth are just as active today 
as they were when two powers stood before the 
Creator and each presented his plan, and when 
Christ was on earth and was tempted on the mount. 

Testimony That Came From Home 

The older I grow the more grateful I am for my 
parents, for their example in the old country home. 
Both Father and Mother lived the Gospel. 

I realize, as perhaps never before, that my testi- 
mony of the reality of the existence of God dates 
back to that home when I was a child, and it was 
through my parents' teachings and their example 
that I received as a child the absolute knowledge that 
God is my Father; that I received then the knowl- 
edge of the reality of the spiritual world; and I 
testify that it is so, that it is a reality. 

It is easy for me to accept as a divine truth the 
fact that Christ preached to the spirits in prison 
while His body lay in the tomb. His body was silent; 
His spirit was in the spiritual realm with His Father. 
It is true! 



(For Course 5, lesson of June 6, "Heavenly Father and Jesus 
Christ"; for Course 9, lesson of June 25, "A Leader Honors His 
Parents"; for Course 13, lesson of July 23, "Testimony"; for Course 
15, lesson of July 2, "Alma and Amulek"; for Course 29, lesson of 
July 2 and 16, "True Church, A Missionary Church" and "His 
Many Mansions"; to support family home evening lessons 14 and 18; 
and of general interest.) 



It is just as easy for me to realize that one may 
so live that he may receive impressions and direct 
messages through the Holy Ghost. The veil is thin 
between those who hold the priesthood and those 
on the other side of the veil. That testimony began 
in the home of my youth because of the example of 
a man — a father who lived the priesthood — and his 
wife, who sustained him and lived it in the home. 

I do not know that Peter had that in mind par- 
ticularly when he mentioned being an example to 
the flock, but I know that such a home is a part 
of that flock. The influence you spread in your home 
will go throughout the town, will go throughout the 
country, the wards, and the stakes. 

My testimony was increased and strengthened 
through the training and teaching I received in the 
auxiliary organizations and priesthood quorums of 
the Church. 

By Those in Authority 

The most precious thing in the world is a testi- 
mony of the truth. Truth never grows old, and the 
truth is that God is the source of your priesthood 
and mine. 

May 15 marks the anniversary of the restoration 
of the Aaronic Priesthood. On that day, in the year 
1829, John the Baptist came to earth as a heavenly 
messenger and conferred this authority upon Joseph 
Smith and Oliver Cowdery. John, the son of Zach- 

{Concluded on following page.) 



MAY 1 967 



173 



RESPOMSIBIUTY OF THE PRIESTHOOD (Concluded from preceding page.) 



arias, was probably the last among the Jews to hold 
the keys of the Aaronic Priesthood, which continued 
among the children of Israel from the time that Moses 
and the higher priesthood were taken from their midst 
until the coming of Christ in the meridian of time. 
From the standpoint of direct authority, therefore, it 

is highly fitting that John should be the messenger 
to restore this authority in this dispensation. He 
held it not only by right of lineage, but also by 
special ordination when he was eight days old. 

This question of divine authority is one of the 
important factors which distinguish the Church of 
Jesus Christ from the Protestant creeds of Christen- 
dom. In plain, unmistakable terms, the Church de- 
clares that "a man must be called of God, by proph- 
ecy, and by the laying on of hands, by those who 
are in authority to preach the Gospel and admin- 
ister in the ordinances thereof." (Fifth Article of 
Faith.) In this declaration, the Church but reiter- 
ates the words of one who bore Christ's authority in 
the meridian of time, and who, in writing upon this 
very question said, "And no man taketh this honour 
unto himself, but he that is called of God, as was 
Aaron.** (Hebrews 5:4.) 

The Order and Will of Christ 

Herein lies one secret of the strength of this 
great latter-day work. Its origin consists not in the 
whims, the desires, or the aspirations of men, but 
in the order and the wiU of Christ Himself, the 
author of our eternal salvation. If one man could 
assume the right to speak in the name of the Lord, 
other men would have the same privilege. If these 
many men all presumed to say, "Thus saith the 
Lord," yet did not see eye to eye on important ele- 
ments of God's kingdom, the inevitable result would 
be confusion, and sincere men and women would be 
driven from, not attracted to, Christ's Church; yet 
these eventually would be made to suffer for not 
having obeyed the principles of life and salvation. 

Yet the real cause of their failure to accept these 
eternal principles would be the fact that unauthor- 
ized men arrogated to themselves the right to offi- 
ciate in things pertaining to God. Herein lies 
the explanation of the discordant condition existing 
among jarring creeds in the so-called Christian 
world today. Men who have no right to do so are 
officiating in the name of Christ. The result, of 
course, is confusion. Whatever else may be said of 
the Prophet Joseph Smith, the strength of his posi- 
tion in regard to divine authority must be recog- 
nized. 

If the world could but realize the full significance 
of the angel John's visit to earth, May 15, 1829, 



multitudes who are praying for the kingdom of God 
to be established among men would gratefully join 
in the commemoration of that heavenly manifesta- 
tion. Their souls would respond to the ecstatic joy 
that Oliver Cowdery expresses in his description of 
the event as follows: 

. . . On a sudden, as from the midst of eternity, 
the voice of the Redeemer spake peace to us. While 
the veil was parted and the angel of God came down 
clothed with glory, and delivered the anxiously 
looked for message, and the keys of the gospel of 
repentance. What joy! what wonder! what amaze- 
ment! While the world wa^ racked and distracted — 
while millions were groping as the blind for the 
wall, and while all men were resting upon uncertain- 
ty, as a general mass, our eyes beheld, our ears 
heard, as in the "blaze of day"; yes, more — above 
the glitter of the May sunbeam, which then shed its 
brilliancy over the face of nature! Then his voice, 
though mild, pierced to the center, and his words, 
"/ am thy fellow servant"; dispelled every fear. We 
listened, we gazed, we admired! 'Twos the voice of 
an angel, from glory, 'twas a message from the Most 
High! And as we heard we rejoiced, while His love 
enkindled upon our souls, and were wrapped in the 
vision of the Almighty! Where was room for doubt? 
Nowhere; uncertainty had fled, doubt had sunk, no 
more to rise, while fiction and deception had fled 
forever!^ 

Who Stands at the Head of The Church? 

Christ did not confer the Aaronic Priesthood 
direct, but recognized John the Baptist, by whose 
authority Jesus Himself had been baptized; and in 
the case of the Melchizedek Priesthood, this was 
restored through Peter, James, and John, unto 
whom Christ Himself had given authority when He 
established His Church at Jerusalem. 

Jesus the Christ is the source of the power of 
the priesthood. As long as members of the priest- 
hood merit the guidance of Christ by honest and 
conscientious dealing with their fellowmen by resist- 
ing evil in any of its forms, by the faithful perform- 
ance of duty, there is no opposing power in this 
world which can stay the progress of the Church 
of Jesus Christ. 

Jesus Christ, the great high priest, stands at 
the head of this Church, and every man who holds 
the priesthood, if he lives properly, soberly, indus- 
triously, humbly, and prayerfully, is entitled to the 
inspiration and guidance of the Holy Spirit. 

God help us to defend the truth — better than 
that, to live it. Exemplify it in our homes. What 
we owe to our parents we cannot express. Are you 
going to have the same influence on your children, 
parents — mothers, fathers, bearers of the priesthood? 



iPearl of Great Price, page 57, footnote. 
Library File Reference: PRIESTHOOD. 



174 



THE INSTRUCTOR 







OLD 

GRIST 

MILL, 

CITY 

CREEK 

CANYON 



THE PIONEER GRIST MILL 



Food, clothing, and shelter — elemental needs of 
the pioneer — determined the earliest industries in 
Utah, one of which was the milling of grain. 

The first grist mill in Salt Lake Valley was a 
small mill, constructed at the mouth of City Creek 
Canyon and made of stones hand-chiseled from the 
mountains. Charles Crismon, who entered the val- 
ley with his family in the Jedediah Grant Company 
on October 2, 1847, was the builder. The crude 
machinery of this mill ground the wheat brought 
overland by the 1847 pioneers. 

As early population increases spread the city 
southward, a second grist mill was built in 1848, this 
time in Mill Creek Canyon by John Neff. Grain was 
brought on horseback from Utah Valley for grind- 
ing in this mill, as was some of the first harvest 
from the area where Ogden now stands. Settlements 
multiplied rapidly, and by 1851 a total of 11 grain 
mills was operating or building in the territory. 

The burr mill process was used to obtain flour 
from wheat in those early days. The burrs consisted 
of a stationary, grooved stone which received the 
wheat, and a rotating, smooth stone above it which 
ground the wheat. A sifter separated the flour from 
the bran and shorts. Circular in shape, the burrs 
were large and heavy, some measuring as much as 
four feet in diameter and 16 inches in thickness, and 
weighing 2,000 pounds. Improvements were devel- 
oped in time, such as passing the wheat through suc- 
cessive sets of burrs to obtain a finer flour, and bolt- 
ing (sifting) by means of a fine-meshed cloth. 

Like the sawmills, of which the territory boasted 
16 in 1851, the grist mills usually were operated by 
water power; and this factor determined their loca- 
tion. Sometimes the best spot for the mill isolated 
it from the settlement, and it was not uncommon 



(For Course la, lesson of June 11, "Making New Homes"; for 
Course 7, lessons of May 21 and July 2, "This Is the Place," "Activi- 
ties in the New Zion," and "Pioneer Life in Utah"; for the general 
use of Course 11; and of general interest.) 



for such a mill to be burned by hostile Indians. 

No nails were available for construction of early 
mills, and mortised joints and pins were consequent- 
ly much in evidence. It was said that the mills were 
built so strongly that hardly a quiver was detectable 
inside when one was in operation. The quality of 
the product was a different story and would cer- 
tainly not have pleased the modern taste, but pal- 
ates were hardier then; and at least this method was 
much quicker and more convenient than the one it 
superseded — crushing grain at home in a coffee 
grinder. 

The grist mills charged a toll, in flour, for grind- 
ing grain. The commodity being so vital and so often 
not in good supply, the extent of the miller's toll was 
of great public concern and frequently provoked 
spirited comment. For a while the tolls of necessity 
were regulated by Church officials. 

A well-known early mill was that built by Isaac 
Chase in Salt Lake City. When completed in 1852, 
it had been four years in the building and was con- 
structed of large, mud adobes, with beams of huge 
timbers hauled from the nearby canyons. It em- 
ployed mill equipment (including four large burrs) 
which the Chase family had brought across the 
plains from Nauvoo in one of their wagons. This mill 
was subsequently acquired by Brigham Young, and 
later, a few years after his death, by Salt Lake City. 
It still stands today on its original site in Liberty 
Park. 

Brigham Young was much involved in mill build- 
ing, and the accompanying picture shows his Em- 
pire Mill, built in the sixties in City Creek Canyon, 
about six miles from its mouth. Samuel J. Sudbury, 
the miller, was kept busy there for 17 years. Fire 
destroyed this mill in 1883 at an estimated loss of 
$23,000. It was never rebuilt. 

— H. George Bickerstaff. 

Library File Reference : UTAH— INDUSTRIES. 



MAY 1967 



175 



PRAY FOR FAITH: 
RECEIVE A PROBLEM 

by Superintendent Royden G. Derrick 



"I feel sorry for the man who doesn't have any 
problems," Norman Vincent Peale said in a meeting 
in New York one evening. "If you don't have a prob- 
lem, go out and get one." My wife and I talked 
about what he said before we went to bed that 
evening. We weren't sure that we agreed with Dr. 
Peale, but now I believe I have come to an under- 
standing of what he had in mind. 

When I have a problem — and it seems that I al- 
ways have at least one — I feel that nobody else has 
a problem except me. But as I find myself involved 
in the lives of others, I discover that nearly every- 
one has a problem to solve, which to him is monu- 
mental. 

If you will look through your history books and 
study the lives of famous men, you will find that 
the truly great ones are those who overcame diffi- 
cult problems. It is not the problem itself which 
builds greatness of character. The message of Nor- 
man Vincent Peale was that it is overcoming a prob- 
lem that builds character. 

When we pray to our Heavenly Father, we often 
pray for wisdom, judgment, understanding, patience, 
tolerance, and many other things. In answer to 
these requests the Lord gives us problems, the over- 
coming of which will develop within us the virtues 
for which we have asked. Ofttimes a problem looks 
so difficult that we are soon asking it be taken 
away. But the Lord in His wisdom lets us work out 
the problem so that by overcoming it we might de- 
velop virtues of eternal value. We pay our respects 
to the Abraham Lincolns, the Henry Fords, and the 
Helen Kellers, not because of the problems they 
faced, but because of the problems they overcame. 

It is obvious to those who are close to the mis- 
sionary program of the Church that our young men 
go into the mission field as boys and return as 
mature men. They leave their homes, families, 
schools, friends, and familiar surroundings, and go 
into strange lands to teach the Gospel. Only a home- 



(For Course 7, lesson of May 28, "Ask And It Shall Be Given 
You"; for Course 9, lesson of July 30, "A Leader Produces Good 
Fruits"; for Course 13, lesson of July 23, "Testimony"; for Course 
19, lesson of May 28, "Spiritual Gifts"; for Course 25, lessons of 
June 11 and July 2 and 16, "Increasing the Mental Powers," "Towards 
Spiritual Maturity," and "Tests and Trials"; for Course 27, lesson 
of May 28, "Obedience"; to support family home evening lessons 18 
and 19; and of general interest.) 



sick missionary knows how difficult this really is! 
But as missionaries meet their challenges, they grow, 
and after two years return home matured beyond 
their years because of the characteristics they have 
developed in overcoming problems. 

Even at home the Church offers unusual oppor- 
tunities for growth if we are willing to accept the 
challenge of the assignments given to us. The bishop 
calls us to be Sunday School teachers, home teach- 
ers, secretaries, Relief Society presidents, and so 
forth, all of which provide opportunities for growth. 

It is not always easy to accept a problem as an 
opportunity. We find a classic example of this in 
Church history. Joseph Smith had been unjustly 
imprisoned for months in Liberty Jail. Petitions and 
appeals to the governor and to the judiciary failed. 
The Prophet appealed fervently to his Heavenly 
Father. In answering, the Lord acknowledged Jo- 
seph's hardships and said that even though these 
and many more might befall him, 

. . . Know thou, my son, that all these things 
shall give thee experience, and shall be for thy good. 
(Doctrine and Covenants 122:7.) 

In the 101st section of the Doctrine and Cove- 
nants we find another example. The Saints who had 
gathered in Missouri were suffering great persecution. 
Mobs had driven them from their homes in Jackson 
County, and threats of death against individuals of 
the Church were many. The Lord at this time re- 
vealed to Joseph Smith the following: 

/, the Lord, have suffered the affliction to come 
upon them, wherewith they have been afflicted, in 
consequence of their transgressions; Yet I will own 
them, and they shall be mine in that day when I 
shall come to make up my jewels. Therefore, they 
must needs be chastened and tried, even as Abra- 
ham, who was commanded to offer up his only son. 
For all those who will not endure chastening, but 
deny me, cannot be sanctified. (Doctrine and Cove- 
nants 101:2-5.) 

As we look at Church history in retrospect, we 
recognize that the chastening of the Saints and the 
hardships through which they passed prepared a 
foundation upon which the Church could build to 



176 



TH E INSTRUCTOR 



fulfill its destiny. The overcoming of their problems 
built a strength which characterized the early pio- 
neers and helped also to strengthen the Church. 

What Norman Vincent Peale did not do in his 
talk, but what he might well have done, was to 
differentiate between problems created by accept- 
ing challenges and problems created by the exercise 
of unwise judgment and improper actions. We should 
make a concerted effort to avoid having to face the 
consequences of wrong decisions. If we are not care- 
ful, our lives become filled with anxieties which were 
created by unnecessary problems. This brings un- 
happiness rather than growth. If we were given a 
choice, perhaps we should elect to share problems 
of other people, thus helping them as well as our- 
selves. 

We would be wise to appeal to our Heavenly 
Father every morning and ask that just for today 
every decision we make be a right decision. If we 
were to do this every morning, and our prayer were 
answered, we might confine our problems to con- 
structive ones and thus build a life of character, 
virtue, and fulfillment. 

Library File Reference: OPPOSITION. 




ROYDEN G. DERRICK 



INSTRU 

Editor : 
President David O. McKay 

Associate Editors; 

Gen. Supt. David Lawrence McKay 

Lorin F, Wheelwright 

Business Manager: 
Richard E. Folland 

Managing Editor: 
Burl Shephard 

Editorial Assistants: 

Virginia Baker 

Goldie B. Despain 

Research Editor; 
H. George Bickerstaff 

Art Director: 
Sherman T. Martin 

CiRCtTLATioN Manager: 
Joan Barkdull 

Subscriber-Relations Director : 
Marie F. Felt 

Instructor Secretary; 
Amy J. Pyrah 

Consultant : 
A. William Lund 



CTOR STAFF 

Instructor Editorial Committee: 
Lorin F. Wheelwright, chairman; Rich- 
ard E. Folland, Ruel A. Allred, Mar- 
shall T. Burton, Victor B. Cline, Catidn 
C. Cook, Reed C. Durham, Jr., Henry 
Eyring, Elmer J. Hartvigsen, Dean A. 
Peterson, Warren E. Pugh, Ethna 
Reid, Wayne F. Richards, G. Robert 
Ruff, Alexander Schreiner, Donna D. 
Sorensen, Ralph Woodward, Thomas 
J. Parmley. 

Instructor-use and Circulation Commit- 
tee: G. Robert Ruff, chairman; Calvin 
C. Cook, Dean A. Peterson. 



Published by the Deseret Sunday School Union 
of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints, the first day of every month at Salt Lake 
City, Utah. Entered at Salt Lake City Post Office 
as second class matter acceptable for mailing at 
special rate of postage provided in Section 1103, 
Act of Oct. 3, 1917, authorized on July 8. 1928. 
Copyright 1967 by the Deseret Sunday School 
Union Board. All rights reserved. 

Thirty to forty-five days' notice required for 
change of address. When ordering a change, 
please include address slip from a recent issue 
of the magazine. Address changes cannot be 
made unless the old address as well as the new 
one is included. Also, report the new postal ZIP 
Code number. 

Mail subscriptions to The Instructor, 79 South 
State Street, Salt Lake City, Utah 84111. Subscrip- 
tion price is S3 per year paid in advance. Single 
issues, 35 cents each. 

Bound volumes sell for $6.75 when all maga- 
zines are furnished by The Instructor. When sub- 
scriber supplies his own issues, binding charge 
is $3.75. 



MAY 1967 



177 



NEXT MONTH IN YO 



Lessons during the month of June, 1967 



A CAPSULE GUIDE FOR HOME 
' TEACHERS AND PARENTS " 
TO STIMULATE AHENDANCL 
** AT SUNDAY SCHOOL - 




A Gospel of Love 

Course 1 {age 3) 

It SEEMS easier for adults to do things for children 
than to teach them to do for themselves. However, 
wise parents and teachers assist children to as- 
sume all responsibilities their capabilities allow. 
In June Course 1 children will be taught to put 
their things where they belong, to take their turn in 
asking the blessing on the food, to feed themselves, 
and to help get themselves ready for Sunday School 
or other events. 

Beginnings of Religious Praise 

Course la (age 4) 

Our Heavenly Father has a special plan to guide each 
of us. He has chosen helpers to tell us about His 
plan. They are called prophets. Prophets are given 
special messages for our Heavenly Father's children 
all over the earth. Brigham Young was a prophet. 



Our Heavenly Father told him to lead the people to 
the place we now call Salt Lake Valley. They built 
new homes and wide, straight streets. They planted 
trees and grass and made a beautiful city. They also 
built a beautiful temple. 

Growing in the Gospel, Part II 

Course 3 {ages 5,6) 

Can young children learn to obey the Lord's com- 
mandments? Of course they can! Just as they were 
fed milk before solid food, they must be taught 
simple Gospel truths as taught by Jesus. These sim- 
ple commandments about being kind and loving to 
the people around them must be learned as a foun- 
dation for other commandments to be learned later. 

Living Our Religion, Part II 

Course 5 {ages 7,8) 

What does it mean to ''hunger and thirst after 
righteousness" and what is accomplished by it? 
Children in this course will be taught that they must 
prepare themselves so that they are in tune with 
the Holy Ghost before they can receive blessings. 

History of the Church for Children 

Course 7 {ages 9, 10) 

Mormon Pioneers will become real to Course 7 chil- 
dren as they share, vicariously, the pioneer fight 
against hunger, the daily experiences of the hand- 
cart companies and of those who came by stage- 
coach. The youngsters will discuss the buildings on 
Temple Square in Salt Lake City. They will thrill to 
the stories of pioneer contacts with Indians, and of 
the great army which marched against the Mormons. 

Scripture Lessons in Leadership 

Course 9 {ages 11, 12) 

Even though he was king, Benjamin worked with his 
own hands to earn a living for himself and his family. 






■.XJ 



178 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



UR SUNDAY SCHOOL 



King Benjamin was also the spiritual leader of the 
Nephites, and he called all the people together so that 
he could teach them the Gospel once more before he 
died. There were so many people he had to build a 
tower on which to stand so that he could be seen 
and heard by more people. 

History of the Restored Church 

Course 11 (ages 13, 14) 

When were the early leaders of the United States 
and other eminent men baptized, and what were the 
circumstances? June lessons will outline temple ordi- 
nances and the reasons for them. Students will learn 
that there are temples in five countries. Early 
Church activities in irrigation, livestock raising, and 
drama will be discussed. 

Principles of the Restored Church at Work 

Course 13 (ages 15, 16) 

It sometimes seems that all we hear is "don't, donH, 
don't" — the negative side of Church teachings. June 
lessons for this course will emphasize the "do's," 
bringing out the fact that joy is the goal of our life 
and the positive things we can do to reach that goal. 

Life in Ancient America 

Course 15 {ages 17, 18) 

Apparently God forgave Alma his youthful iniquities. 
Will our Heavenly Father do as much for us? How 
can we obtain forgiveness? June lessons will detail 
the steps necessary, including that of forgiving 
others. 

The Articles of Faith 

Course 19 {ages 19-22) 

The Dead Sea Scrolls indicate that the principles 
taught by Jesus were not new, they had been taught 



by others in the general area of Palestine. June les- 
sons will discuss an overall view of the Old and New 
Testaments and the Book of Mormon to discover 
other places and times when those same principles 
were taught. 

Gospel Living in the Home 

Course 25 {adults) 

Name calling, glittering generalities, transfer, testi- 
monial technique, card stacking, plain folks, band 
wagon. June lessons show that all of us can be mis- 
led by propaganda devices, and we must learn to 
recognize them. In so increasing our mental powers, 
we can develop sound conclusions and become more 
mature. 

The Gospel in the Service of Man 

Course 27 {adults) 

Absolute equality among men is not possible, except 
in opportunity to improve themselves. June lessons 
teach that each individual has abilities and talents 
different from those of every other individual. Les- 
sons discuss how each must use his abilities to assist 
all in the struggle for religious and social welfare 
and economic security. 

A Marvelous Work and a Wonder 

Course 29 {adults) 

The literal gathering of Israel will be culminated in 
two places. The literal gathering of the Jews to Pal- 
estine is only the beginning. All Israel must be gath- 
ered out of the nations of the world, including the 
Ten Lost Tribes. Where will they all gather? Why 
is it important that they gather? June lessons will 
explore this subject. 





* zi iST ■■'"^^^^ 



MAY 1967 



179 



Suggested Lesson for Stake Conference 
Sunday, Third Quarter, 1967 

by Dale H. West 



When two substances are brought together, there 
is nearly always a reaction of some kind. Sometimes 
it is easily detected; at other times it is so subtle that 
we often are unaware of any influence or reaction. 
But there is a change; the substances will 
no longer be exactly the same. 



Objective: 

To reemphasize the fact that whenever we meet 
together, we influence one another, that we have a 
great responsibility for what others do and become, 
that we are our brother's keeper. 




THE TRUE TEST OF OUR INFLUENCE 



A class in general science had just settled down 
to watch the instructor perform various experiments 
on the laboratory table. His objective was to show 
what happens when two substances or materials are 
brought together. 

First he poured granulated sugar into a beaker 
and added sulfuric acid. The sugar immediately 
burned, leaving a sticky, black substance. Next he 
placed what looked like little rocks — an iron com- 
pound, he said — in a test tube and added hydro- 
chloric acid; the students soon detected rotten-egg 
gas. Into another tube half-filled with a clear liquid 
he dropped a powder, and the perfimie of violets 
filled the room. 

Onto three watch glasses he poured different 
solutions and then set Bunsen burners beneath them 
until all the liquid had evaporated. One glass was 
coated with a white, powdery material; another was 
stained an ugly, brownish-yellow; the third held 
beautiful, white crystals. 

These experiments, he summarized, produced a 
"residue" — that which is left behind after combus- 
tion or evaporation or some other process. 

Continuing, he placed iron filings on a paper 



(For Course 3, lesson of July 9, "We Are Commanded to Be 
Reverent"; for Course 5, lesson of July 9, "Am I My Brother's 
Keeper?" "Tolerance," and "Peacemakers"; for Course 15, lesson 
of July 23, "Helaman"; for Course 19, lesson of May 28. "Spiritual 
Gifts"; for Course 25, lesson of Jtme 25, "Human Relationships"; for 
Course 27, lesson of June 4, "Religious and Social Welfare"; and of 
general interest.) 



and held the paper over a magnet. Immediately the 
filings assumed a symmetrical pattern, showing, he 
said, a magnetic field. When copper filings did not 
respond in the same way, one student remarked, 
"Copper is not influenced by the magnet." As a reply, 
the instructor passed the magnet back and forth 
over a copper wire attached to a meter, causing a 
needle to fluctuate, indicating that an electric cur- 
rent had been generated. Other experiments fol- 
lowed, including those to show that like poles of the 
magnet repel, unlike poles attract. 

The instructor closed the class with the generali- 
zation that when two substances are brought togeth- 
er, there is nearly always a reaction of some kind. 
Sometimes it is easily detected; at other times it is 
so subtle that at the moment we often are unaware 
of any influence or reaction. But there is a change, 
he commented; the substances will no longer be ex- 
actly the same. 

The Interaction of People 

Although analogy is fraught with dangers, can we 
see similarities between these experiments and the 
interaction when two or more people associate? In 
what ways can we find applications to our lives, to 
human relationships? 

Whenever people come together or when they 
perform deeds that involve others, in some way they 



180 



THE I NSTRUCTOR 



will leave an influence. As President David 0. Mc- 
Kay has stated, "Every man and every person who 
lives in this world wields an influence, whether for 
good or for evil. It is not what he says alone; it is 
not alone what he does. It is what he is. . . ."^ The 
implication is that we influence others; and others 
influence us, whether we plan it or desire it or know 
it. And through our thoughts and actions we in- 
fluence our own character and personality. (See 
Proverbs 23:1.) 

Our Sphere of Influence 

Think back over your activities in the past sev- 
eral hours. Did someone say or do something that 
lightened your day? Has someone brought a negative 
note into your life? Are there some people who tend 
naturally to leave a residue of crystals, and others 
only stains? Are there some who attract, some who 
repel? 

As we examine our activities in daily life, we find 
various spheres of influence: the home, with the in- 
terrelationships of parents and children; the neigh- 
borhood, the community, and the school; our circle 
of close friends; the church, including instruction, 
social activities, and worship. 

If we stop but a moment, we can easily see some 
of the obvious influences one person has on another. 
A son tends to drive like his father, yielding the 
right of way to a pedestrian, or sUpping through a 
stop sign, or parking carefully between marked 
Hnes. A teen-age girl usually dresses like her friends, 
even though the style of dress is not necessarily be- 
coming to her. Seminary students tell the same kinds 
of stories and jokes they hear in class. A person 
who is courteous and helpful to his neighbor usually 
finds that his neighbors have similar qualities. A 
family that holds regular family evenings is more 
often than not closely knit, considerate, and loving. 
Few children learn what prayer is unless they learn 
it from their parents. 

Our Influence in Church 

Reflect on your own ward meetings and classes 
for a moment. Can you remember people who helped 
create a worshipful atmosphere? Were there any who 
caused distractions? Were some parents unaware of 
their responsibilities? How do the custodian, the 
usher, the chorister, determine the effectiveness of 
meetings and classes? What part does the bishop 
play? 

Our general authorities have repeatedly coun- 
seled us that self-control, self-mastery, is one of our 
chief objectives in life. If a child has not learned 
self-discipline, he will reduce not only his own op- 
portunities to learn but also the opportunities of 

^''Radiation of the Individual," by President David O. McKay; 
The Insiructor, October, 1964, page 373. 



others. President McKay gives very definite guide- 
lines for all who serve as officers and teachers in the 
various Church organizations, especially those who 
are teachers of the younger members: 

In the classrooms children should be taught, 
should be free to discuss, free to speak, free to par- 
ticipate in classwork, but no member of the class 
has the right to distract another student by jostling 
or making light and frivolous remarks. I think in 
this church . . . teachers and leaders ought not to 
permit it. Disorder injures the child who makes 

Good order in the classroom is essential to in- 
still into the hearts and lives of young men and 
young women the principle of self-control. They want 
to talk and they want to whisper, but they can- 
not do it because it will disturb somebody else. Learn 
the power and lesson of self-mastery. 

Reverence should be particularly manifest in 
sacrament meetings, in quorum meetings, in Sunday 
School, in MIA, in Primary, yes, and in Relief So- 
ciety. . . . People come to our houses of worship for 
light and knowledge, for instruction; and they have a 
right to find it when they come. Disorder and irrever- 
ence should not interfere with that right.^ 

Probably at no time is the influence of one per- 
son on another felt more than during moments of 
worship. The bishop on the stand can effectively 
control the attitude of his ward members in worship 
services over which he presides. If he assumes his 
position with dignity and reverence, sits quietly, and 
appears thoughtful and pleasant, then others present 
will adopt a similar pattern — ^much more so than if 
he were to give a talk on reverence. 

Two girls who whisper during the passing of the 
sacrament may make this sacred service distasteful 
or meaningless to those around them as well as to 
themselves. If they leave before the services are 
over, they create a negative influence on others. 
President McKay emphasized our responsibility 
when he said that "it is disrespectful to talk or even 
whisper during a sermon ... it is the height of 
rudeness to leave a worshiping assembly before 
dismissal."^ 

Those who feel that they are free to talk during 
the singing of hymns probably are unaware that for 
many people music provides one of the most satis- 
fying means of worship. The history of the Church 
is a history of music-loving people using songs in 
worship and instruction. 

Sharing a testimony with others is one of the 

most generous gifts we can give to our fellowmen, 

especially if we also live righteously. Bearing a 

testimony, we are told, is a prime means of bringing 

{Concluded on page 183.) 

^"Reverence, A Sign of Nobility and Strength," by Pr^ident 
David O. McKay, The Instructor, January, 1966, page 3. 

''"Reverence, the Highest of Human Feelings," by President David 
O. McKay, The Instructor, May, 1962, page 146. 



MAY 1967 



181 



THE BALANCE OF 
CHURCH AND STATE 



by Jesse A. UdalV 



The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 
proclaims that there should be a well-balanced work- 
ing relationship between the Church and the State, 
in order that society can receive the utmost in bene- 
fits and security from both of these great institu- 
tions. For example, two of the well-defined articles 
of our religion assert: 

(1) We claim the privilege of worshiping Al- 
mighty God according to the dictates of our own 
conscience, and allow all men the same privilege, let 
them worship how, where, or what they may. 

(Eleventh Article of Faith.) 

(2) We believe in being subject to kings, presi- 
dents, rulers, and magistrates, in obeying, honoring, 
and sustaining the law. (Twelfth Article of Faith.) 

It is apparent that these two great concepts in the 
field of religion and government give to men a broad 
and sure foundation for their faith in both Church 
and State. 

Even though the teachings of the Son of God 
were primarily religious in nature, He was careful 
not to offend the prerogatives of the State. His 
attitude on this matter is well-expressed in the fol- 
lowing scriptures. 

Is it lawful for us to give tribute unto Caesar, 
or no? . . . he perceived their craftiness, and said 
unto them, Why tempt ye me? 

Shew me a penny. Whose image and superscrip- 
tion hath it? They answered and said, Caesar's. 

And he said unto them. Render therefore unto 
Caesar the things which be Caesar's, and unto God 
the things which be God's. (Luke 20:22-25.) 

In Bible and Book of Mormon times, the 
people often had occasion to deal with difficult prob- 
lems that arose in the relationship of Church and 
State. For our understanding and guidance, let us 
review what the Church has said in the scriptures of 
our day: , 

. . . Governments were instituted of God for the 
benefit of man; and . . . he holds men accountable 

(For Course 3, lesson of June 4, "The Lord Has Given Us Laws"; 
for Course 13, lesson of July 30, "Prayer"; for Course 15, lesson of 
June 4, "The Church Established"; for Course 19, lessons of May 21 
and July 30, "Plan and Government in the Restored Church" and 
"Religious Liberty and Toleration"; for Course 25, lesson of July 9, 
"Free Agency and Choice"; for Course 27, lesson of July 7, "Church 
and State"; and of general interest.) 



for their acts in relation to them, both in making 
laws and administering them, for the good and safety 
of society. 

. . . No government can exist in peace, except 
such laws are framed and held inviolate as will se- 
cure to each individual the free exercise of conscience, 
the right and control of property, and the protec- 
tion of life. 

. . . All governments necessarily require civil offi- 
cers and magistrates to enforce the laws of the same; 
. . . such as will administer the law in equity and 
justice should be sought for and upheld by the voice 
of the people if a republic, or the will of the sov- 
ereign. (Doctrine and Covenants 134:1-3.) 

Having set out in broad outline the responsibili- 
ties of governments toward the Church, the scrip- 
tures then proceed to define the place of the Church 
in society. 

We believe that religion is instituted of God; and 
that men are amenable to him, and to him only, for 
the exercise of it, unless their religious opinions 
prompt them to infringe upon the rights and liber- 
ties of others; but we do not believe that human 
law has a right to interfere in prescribing rules of 
worship to bind the consciences of men, nor dictate 
forms for public or private devotion; that the civil 
magistrate should restrain crime, but never control 
conscience; should punish guilt, but never suppress 
the freedom of the soul. 

We believe that all men are bound to sustain and 
uphold the respective governments in which they 
reside. . . . 

We do not believe it just to mingle religious 
influence with civil government. . . . (Doctrine and 
Covenants 134:4, 5, 9.) 

It is the position of the Church that the right 
to deal with the members of the Church for viola- 
tions of Church laws and regulations is strictly re- 
served to the Church. However, it also is a tenet 
of Church government that the only punishment the 
Church can inflict is excommunication or temporary 
separation from Church privileges. All other types 
of punishment are left with the State. 



*Jesse A. Udall is a justice of the Arizona Supreme Court. He 
earned his law degree from University of Arizona (1924). He served 
as president of the California Mission (1958-1960) and is presently 
Tempe Stake patriarch. Brother Udall has served in leadership posi- 
tions in Rotary Club and American Legion, and has earned the 
Silver Beaver award in scouting.. He married Lela Lee; they have 
six children. Brother and Sister Udall are members of Tempe 4th 
Ward, Tempe (Arizona) Stake. 



182 



THE I NSTRUCTOR 



The basic and vital principle of freedom should 
be maintained in every government the world 
over, whether men are subject to kings or presidents, 
since the Lord has said, "all men are bound to sus- 
tain and uphold the respective governments in which 
they reside." 

The scriptures clearly indicate that constitution- 
al governments afford particular assurance of free- 
dom of religion, unfettered by any dictatorial power 
from the state. This glorious principle is proclaimed 
in the Doctrine and Covenants, where the Lord gives 
special approval for the establishment of constitu- 
tional governments: 

And that law of the land which is constitutional, 
supporting that principle of freedom in maintaining 
rights and privileges, belongs to all mankind, and is 
justifiable before me. (Doctrine and Covenants 98: 
5.) 

The principle is further emphasized in the scrip- 
tures in connection with the founding of the gov- 
ernment of the United States, where the true Church 
of Jesus Christ was established. The Lord, speaking 
through the Prophet Joseph Smith, said: 

. . . The laws and constitution of the people, 
which I have suffered to be established . . . should 
be maintained for the rights and protection of all 
flesh, according to just and holy principles. 

And for this purpose have I established the Con- 
stitution of this land, by the hands of wise men 
whom I raised up unto this very purpose, and re- 
deemed the land by the shedding of blood. (Doc- 
trine and Covenants 101: 77, 80.) 

The sacred character of the Constitution of the 



United States has been acclaimed by all the proph- 
ets who have stood at the head of the Church in 
this dispensation. Joseph Smith said: 

. . . The Constitution of the United States is a 
glorious standard; it is founded in the wisdom of 
God. It is a heavenly banner; it is to all those who 
are privileged with the sweets of its liberty, like the 
cooling shades and refreshing waters of a great rock 
in a thirsty and weary land. It is like a great tree 
under whose branches men from every clime can be 
shielded from the burning rays of the sun.^ 

And Brigham Young, who followed him, declared: 

We will cling to the Constitution of our country, 
and to the government that reveres that sacred char- 
ter of freemen's rights; and if necessary, pour out 
our best blood for the defense of every good and 
righteous principle.^ 

For nearly two centuries this system of govern- 
ment has worked in America. The first amendment 
to the Constitution, which provides that "Congress 
shall make no law respecting an establishment of re- 
ligion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof," still 
stands firm. Perhaps the genius of the Constitution 
was pointed out by President John Adams early in 
our history when he said, "The Constitution and' 
laws of the United States are great because they are 
inscribed in the hearts and lives of its people." 

So long as this ideal is cherished and fostered, 
the Church and State will move forward together in 
majesty and power. 



^Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith, compiled by Joseph 
Fielding Smith; Deseret Book Company, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1958; 
page 147. 

^Discourses of Brigham Young, compiled by John A. Widtsoe; 
Deseret Book Company, Salt Lake City. Utah, 1958; page 550. 
Library File Reference: CHURCH AND STATE. 



THE TRUE TEST OF OUR INFLUENCE {Concluded from page 181.) 



understanding and belief to the hearts of our asso- 
ciates. 

The true test of our influence on one another 
is the life of each individual. Through the 
combined influence of many people, a person be- 
comes what he is — a crystal, a white powder, or a 
stain. The real crystals are those who marry in the 
temple, go on missions, honor the priesthood, say 
and do those things in harmony with Christ's Ufe and 
teachings. If we recognize our deep responsibility to 
ourselves and to one another, then we truly become 
our brother's keeper. 



Additional References: 

1. Jacob 2:17, 21. 

2. Doctrine and Covenants 38: 24-25. 

3. Genesis 4:9. 

4. John 2:16. 

5. Matthew 5:28; 22:29, S9. 

6. "Influencing Another Human Being," from Of Earth 
And In Heaven, chapter 5; 1967 Course of Study for the 
Melchizedek Priesthood Quorums. 

7. President David O. McKay, editorials in The Instruc- 
tor: (a) "Keeping Ourselves 'Unspotted from the World,' " 
September, 1964, pages 329-331; (b) "Man's Greatest Trust," 
June, 1964, pages 205-207; (c) "Uplifting Influence of Mor- 
mon Home Life," July, 1962, pages 217-218. 

8. "There Was a ChUd Went Forth," by Walt Whit- 
man; The Oxford Book of American Verse, Oxford Univer- 
sity Press, New York, N.Y.; page 276. 

Library File Reference: HUMAN RELATIONS. 



MAY 1967 



183 



"FOR THEY 
SHALL SEE' 



A Father's Day Story 
by Catharine D. Bartholomew'' 




by Sherman T. Martin. 



To be a father is the most important part of a 
man's life. To be a good father, setting the proper 
example for his children, is within the power of 

(For Course 5, lesson of July 2, "Pure In Heart"; for Course 9, 
lessons of June 25 and July 2, "A Leader Honors His Parents" and 
"A Leader Is Against Evil"; for Course 13, lesson of July 2, "Helps 
to Safety and Happiness"; for Course 25, lesson of July 23, "Tests 
and Trials"; to support family home evening lessons 13 and 14; 
and of general interest.) 

*Catharine D. Bartholomew is the wife of Henry L. Bartholomew 
and they are parents of two boys. They are members of Gunnison 
Ward, Gunnison (Utah) Stake. Sister Bartholomew served in the 
Northwestern States Mission (1926-1928) and attended Brigham 
Young University. She was born in Taylor, Arizona, and has taught 
school in her home state and at Maeser School in Provo, Utah. Her 
current Church assignments include those of Sunday School teacher. 
Guide Patrol leader, and member of the Relief Society stake board. 



every man who tries to understand and prayerfully 
seeks not to rule, but to lead, his family. The fol- 
lowing story is told by a father. 

My father is still a tower of strength to me, even 
though I was only seven when he died. My only 
brother, Steve, was six. Now I am the father of 
three sons — nine and seven years, and eight months; 
and two daughters — five and three. They know their 
grandfather only through me. This fact was brought 
home to me while I was away on a business trip. On 
my return journey, I stopped in my home town, 
many states away from where I now live. I went to 
the cemetery to see if the iris and the little pine tree 
we had planted years ago had survived our long 
absence. They were flourishing. Then my thoughts 
turned from my father to my wife and children, and 
I hurried home. 

The welcome I received was worth all the time, 
expense, and worry of the trip. Gene and Roger 
could hardly wait for me to stop the car. Their 
fond embraces were so sincere, I could feel every 
moment of their loneliness without me. 

"Daddy, we prayed every day for your safe re- 
turn," and, "I minded Mother just like you said." 
Tears were mingled with the lavish kisses of my 
daughters, and the smile of pride and happiness 
on their mother's face told me that her love cov- 
ered all my faults, and was yet enough to fill and 
completely surround the home we had built together. 

After dinner my wife suggested I visit with the 
children. "They have missed you so much," she said. 
After baby Paul was put to bed the older children 
and I went to the piano. 

"What! The piano is closed? Hasn't anyone been 
playing and singing while I've been gone?" I asked. 

"We couldn't sing without you, Daddy," said 
Marcia as she put Jane on one side of the bench, 
while she sat close to me on the other side. I began 
to play the nursery rhymes we all knew: "How Many 
Miles to Boston Town?" and "Bye, Baby, Bye Low." 
How they all sang! We could hear their mother's 
voice, high and clear an octave above us. 

"Listen," I said, "there's a nightingale in the 
kitchen." We all laughed. 

Soon Ann came in and we all sat on the long 
sofa. It didn't take a very long sofa to hold such a 
closely knit family as ours that night. 

"Now for a story!" cried Roger. 

"It must be my turn to tell one," I said. "On my 
way coming back to you I went to Springdale to 
visit your grandfather." 

"Oh, Daddy, Grandfather is dead. How could 
you see him?" asked Marcia. 

"I didn't see him, but we had a good visit at his 
graveside." 



184 



TH E I NSTRUCTOR 



Then I began to feel the intense results of my 
visit to the last resting place of a great man. I 
closed my eyes. 

"I was a little boy again,'* I said, "and your 
Uncle Steve and I were running through the park 
with Dad. No matter how fast we ran he could al- 
ways get to the swimming pool first, or he could 
find the best table for our lunch. Sometimes, right 
in the middle of the meal he would take our hands 
quickly and silently and lead us off through the 
trees. Soon we would see a chipmunk, a rabbit, or a 
squirrel, or maybe a robin or a dove. One day it 
was a baby deer. Next time it was a mother pheas- 
ant and her brood that "froze" to the ground like 
ten little clumps of mud. My mind is racing fast, 
I can't tell it all. He loved the animals. The trees 
were his friends. 'Bury me where a pine tree can 
shade my grave,' he told us. Steve and I planted 
the pine tree on his grave. It is taller than I am 
now, and I'm sure Grandfather likes it. 

"He took us fishing to the creek. One day Steve 
snagged his hook and was pulled into the stream. 
All three of us got wet before we could get him 
to shore. 

"Then came Father's illness. For many years, 
even before Steve was bom, both Father and Mother 
knew he had a disease that could kill him. We 
prayed that the Lord would heal him, and He did 
allow Father to live and accomplish many things. 
There were weeks in the hospital, but when he was 
better he earned a doctor's degree in soil chemistry. 
We moved to a different climate to see if it would 
improve Father's health. He was soil chemist at the 
university there, and he loved his work. He would 
tell us how important the soil is, that all life de- 
pends on the good old earth. He taught us that the 
materials of our bodies are all taken from the earth, 
and some day they will return to it. 

"Then one day he realized his time was limited. 
He began to go blind. Oh, how we prayed for his 
eyes to get well! By the time summer vacation came, 
he resigned his position at the university, and Mother 
went to school to see if she could get her degree 
before Father's sickness would make him helpless. 

"To Steve and me this was a memorable time. Our 
father was with us all day. He could see well enough 
to make us splendid lunches and help Mother get 
the dinner. He played with us, making tinkertoy 
windmills and fans and attaching them to small 
motors to cool our comer of the playroom. He could 
invent anything we wanted. 

"Our attic walls had not been finished. It was 
exciting to play up there, but it wasn't safe, so 
Father decided to make us a big playroom. Mother 
bought the wall paneling; and Steve and I helped 



with the measuring, the sawing, and driving the 
nails. We finished those walls beautifully, Mother 
said. 

"We would read together. Both Steve and I 
learned to read fluently under our father's patient 
care. He sang to us and with us. He whistled when 
he was not singing. Then, later, sometimes he would 
lie on his bed in severe pain. He didn't groan or 
cry out. He would let me get a clean handkerchief 
and wipe the sweat from his brow, or bring him a 
glass of cold water. 

"He taught us lessons from his big books. He 
cut the lawns when he felt well enough. As we 
planted flowers and vegetables, he used us for his 
eyes. His hands never failed him. He seemed to 
love each plant as he patted the soil around it. And 
they seemed to answer him, 'We love you,' for they 
grew abundantly. 

"Finally, Father was too ill to go to Church any 
more, but he knew a great deal of the Bible from 
memory, so when I tried to read his favorite scrip- 
tures he could correct or assist me. He loved Psalm 
24: 

The earth is the Lord's, 
and the fulness thereof; 
the world, and they that dwell therein. 
For he hath founded it upon the seas, 
and established it upon the floods. 
Who shall ascend into the hill of the Lord? 
or who shall stand in his holy place? 
He that hath clean hands, and a pure heart, . . . 

(Psalm 24:1-4.) 

"We all knew Psalm 23. Father loved it most of 
all. We would repeat it every night before our eve- 
ning prayer. He would take our hands just as he 
had done when we were mnning in the park. One 
night he said, 

" 'Let me lead you to the green pastures so you 
will grow tall and straight and have thoughts that 
will grow and do good for your dear mother and 
other people. Let me lead you beside the still wa- 
ters. God loves each one of us. He will restore our 
souls if we will let him. Think clean thoughts, clear 
as the water. 

" 'Fill your minds with fresh, growing things such 
as love, kindness, generosity, charity, faith, hope, 
patience. Those great thoughts go on and on till 
they come to the very throne of God, and make us 
His children indeed. But quarreling, fighting, vulgar 
or impure thoughts lead us away from good to evil; 
and unless we repent, we forget God. One day we 
will know it is better to follow the path of loving 
kindness and to enjoy the sweet, clear waters of 
clean living.' 

"One day I called Mother to come quickly. Fa- 
(Concluded on following page.) 



MAY 1967 



185 



"FOR THEY SHALL SEE" {Concluded from preceding page.) 



ther was breathing strangely, and he wouldn't wake 
up no matter what I said to him. The doctors had 
told Mother that was the way it would be. The 
ambulance came and took him to the hospital. That 
evening he died. 

"After that our house wasn't like home. I could 
not sing. I wasn't hungry. I wandered from room to 
room. I did not know what I wanted to see, nor 
what I wanted to hear. We put Father's clothes 
and books in his room, and I went there often. One 
day I noticed a bookmark in his Bible. I opened it 
and read, 'Blessed are the pure in heart: for they 
shall see God.' (Matthew 5:8.) That was what I 
wanted to know! 



*' 'Oh, Mother,' I cried out, Ve don't need to 
see for Daddy any more. He can see for himself! He 
can see God!' " 

My sons snuggled a Little closer to me. 

"Will we see God, too?" asked Roger. 

"Yes, if we live like Grandfather." 

We knelt to have our evening prayer. "It's my 
turn. Daddy," said Marcia. And she prayed: 

"Our Heavenly Father, we thank Thee for Grand- 
father. We are glad he can see Thee. Help us all to 
see Thee. And we thank Thee for bringing our 
Daddy safely home to us. Amen." 



Library File Reference: FATHERS. 



THE BEST FROM THE PAST 



Abbreviations on the chart are as follows: 

First number is the year; second number is the month; 

third nimiber is the page. (e.g. 60-3-103 means 1960, 

March, page 103.) 



July 



16 



23 



30 



Fbs — flannelboard story 

Isbc — inside back cover. 

Conv — Convention Issue. 

CR — Centennieil Reprint. 

* — not available. Use ward library 



Cs — centerspread. 
Osbc — outside back cover. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL COURSE NUMBER 



1 



57-11-347 

61-Conv- 

14 
61-6-194 

65-7-Cs 

66-2-60 



61-4-136 



62-6-190 
62-7-237 

63-5-Fbs 
63-6-226 

65-5-202 



la 



59-3-85* 

63-1-20 

64-4-138 

65-9-357 
65-12- 
488* 

66-9-334 



61-1-28 

62-12-Fbs 

63-2-51 

65-3-Cs 

65-7-Fbs 

65-11-Cs* 



63-12-Cs, 
443 

65-6-Cs 



59-8-Covei 62-1-Fbs* 

63-5-Fbs 65-8-Cs 
63-6-226 

64-5-186 
64-9-366 

65-5-202 



63-1-3 
63-5-169, 
Fbs, 202 

65-5-202 
65-6-235, 
Fbs 

66-3-112 
66-5-204 



61-5-174 
61-6-214 

66-1-2 
66-2-60 



61-4-136 
63-5-177 
65-6-222 
66-4-154 



63-5-Fbs 
63-6-226 

65-5-202 



56-11- 
326* 

61-6-212 

63-6-207 

67-3-Cs 



61-6-188 

63-6-207, 
214 

66-2-73 



65-8-311 
65-9-354 

66-4-158 



59-5-137 

61-5-145, 
162 

65-3-Fbs 
65-6-Fbs 



59-5-140 
59-7-243 

61-5-160 

63-5-158 

66-3-94 
66-10-384 



58-1-1 
62-1-6* 
63-12-435 
65-7-266 



56-11-326^ 

63-2-44 

65-8-314 



59-5-140 

61-6-201 

63-6-207, 
218 

65-8-314 



61-5-156 
61-6-Cs 
61-8-Cs 
61-12-Cs 

63-6-196, 
209, Fbs 

66-9-329 
66-10- 
Cover 



59-5-Fbs 

61-6-215 

63-5-158 
63-6-196 

66-1-34 



63-5-156, 

162 
63-6-Isbc 

65-5-180 
65-9-Isbc 

66-9-334, 
361 



59-5-140 

61-5-Isbc 

65-5-165, 
204 



59-5-150 

61-5-Isbc 

63-5-162 



61-5-158 
63-6-218 



65-12-Fbs 
65-5-167 
65-11- 
Isbc* 

66-4-CR 
66-9-334 
66-12-Fbs 



59-6-Fbs 

61-5-156 
61-6-192 

63-6-200, 
Fbs 

65-5-167, 
183 



61-5-147 
61-6-208 

63-5-162, 
182 

65-5-168, 
182 



59-7-212 

61-6-192 

63-5-182 

65-5-168 

66-4-CR, 

132 
66-9-334 




13 



59-5-148, 

Cs, Fbs 

63-6-200 



59-9-294 



59-5-152 
59-8-252 

65-8-Isbc 



57-7-222 
61-8-253 



59-9-288 
61-9-322 
65-9-Isbc 



59-7-212 

63-5-151, 
164, 177 

63-6-202, 
214 

65-5-165, 
180 

66-4-154 



Review 



63-6-204, 
Fbs, 220 



59-6-180 

63-5-182 

65-5-Isbc 

66-4-141, 
Isbc 



15 



59-5-150 
59-6-199 

61-5-Isbc 
61-6-208 

63-5-162 

65-5-204 



61-5-147, 
Isbc 

63-5-162 
63-6-220, 
225 

65-5-168 



59-6-178 

61-5-147, 
152 

63-5-162, 
172 

65-1-Fbs 
65-5-165 



59-7-211 
61-5-147 
63-6-225 



63-5-182 

65-5-168, 
208 

66-7-Cs 
66-11- 
Cover 



59-6-178 
66-3-114 



19 



59-2-C3 

59-7-240 

59-8-234 

63-6-Cs 

66-4-Isbc 
66-9-Fbs 



63-5-156 

65-5-165, 
200 

66-4-CR 



59-5-139 

61-5-Cs 

65-1-Isbc 
65-5-167, 
Isbc 

66-3-Cs 



25 



27 



59-5-146 

63-5-164, 
186, 204 
63-6-211 

65-5-165 

66-9-364 
66-10-Isbc 



59-7-209, 
212 

61-6-186 

63-6-225 

66-3-114 



66-2-Cover 
44, Cs, 
Fbs, Isbc 

66-9-Cs 



59-9-286 
66-9-344 



59-7-214 

61-6-186 

63-6-196, 
204 

66-9-329 



Review 



59-7-214 

63-5-Isbc 
63-6-204 



59-6-186 

63-5-149, 
160, 177 

65-5-184 

66-3-90 
66-4-123 



59-8-260 
59-10-317 

64-9-344 



63-5-177 

65-5-174 

66-6-Cover 
208 



29 



61-5-147 

63-5-182 
63-6-Isbc 

65-5-186 

66-5-Cs 

66-7-282 

66-9-361 



61-5-147 
61-8-255 

63-5-162, 
182 



59-6-176 
66-4-CR 



Review 



63-5-171 
63-6-207, 
214 

65-5-165 

66-2-48 

66-8-298 

66-12-464 



61-6-184 

63-6-220, 
225 

65-5-151, 
152, 171 

66-1-21 



63-6-204 
66-12-474 



186 



THE I NSTR UCTOR 



"Teaching Insights" — Fifth in a Series 

DISCIPLINE 

by Lowell L. Bennion 

Discipline is a harsh word, often connoting con- 
trol, enforcement, even punishment. It seems foreign 
and antithetical to Gospel principles such as humil- 
ity, meekness, kindness, and love. 

And yet the need for discipline is always present 
in Sunday School and in all Church classes. A 14- 
year-old boy came home from Church disgusted; he 
spoke of not returning to class the following Sun- 
day because "the kids talked during the whole time 
the teacher was giving the lesson — and it could have 
been a good lesson, too." A non-Mormon mother 
withdrew her two young boys from a Church group 
because the teacher had no control; and the mother 
did not want her young sons to learn disrespect for 
their teacher, the Lord, His house, and themselves. 

Discipline is needed in church as anywhere else 
and is not incompatible with the spirit of the Gospel 
when we learn its true meaning. The word comes 
from the same root as disciple, meaning a follower; 
it is a voluntary commitment by an individual to a 
person, cause, or course of action. The ideal of dis- 
ciphne, and the only kind consistent with spiritual 
growth, is se//-discipline. 

This is easily said, but how is it achieved? Sun- 
day School attendance is voluntary, and traditions 
of laxity often have developed in the name of love 
and kindness. Teachers sometimes feel confused as 
they try to be Gospel teachers and disciplinarians 
at the same time. The following are suggestions 
which have worked for some teachers. You will have 
other methods to share. Nothing is accomplished by 
permitting disorder, continual talking, disrespect for 
teacher and fellow student. 

(1) Discipline is accomplished largely through 
winning the interest of young people. Children come 



to class with their minds reaching in all directions — 
everywhere but on the lesson as conceived in the 
mind of the teacher. He must arrest their attention, 
focus it on something vital, surprising, at times 
dramatic, unexpected — a story, a word, a picture, 
an object, a question, an experience. 

The purpose of the lesson, and hence the body 
of it which develops the purpose, must have some 
relevance for the child's present feeling, thinking, 
and experience. Even the dumb ox will come to 
the manger when it anticipates receiving food. In 
preparing a lesson, let the teacher try to put him- 
self in the place of his students, perhaps of a par- 
ticular student. What are his hungers and thirsts, 
hopes and fears? Teaching calls for imagination; it 
presupposes sensitivity and some empathy with 
students. 

(2) Respect for others grows in good measure out 
of self-respect. Children show off to get attention, 
to feel accepted, to feed starved egos. Show each 
child good will, interest, and love, in and out of class. 
Praise him honestly for his strengths and good 
points. Involve him in discussion and in planning. 
Respect his questions, answers, and efforts. 

(3) One of the most effective ways to get talk- 
ers on the back row to listen is to wait for silence. 
A guest teacher stood before some thirty Explorers 
and Mia Maids one evening to teach a difficult les- 
son on the atonement. He was introduced amidst 
talk on the back row. The teacher held his peace 
and looked the class right in the eye. Everyone 
soon ceased speaking except two ringleaders on row 
13. The class turned around, and these two also 
became still. The teacher had to repeat this once 
more during the evening. And it worked a second 
time. 

The classroom should not be silent as a morgue, 
nor should it be bedlam. Exciting subject matter, 
respeqtful relationships, sometimes waiting in si- 
lence, and other aids will help children learn dis- 
cipleship or self-discipline. 



Library File Reference: TEACHERS AND TEACHING — TECHNIQUES. 



WITHOUT GLORY 

by 

Eva Willes Wangs gaard 



Asked about their hardships 
Which they counted worst, 

Men with Clark and Lewis 
Put mosquitoes first. 

Biting, nipping, teasing, 
Singing day and night — 

Where's the glory facing 
Foes too small to fight? 



Bouts with beasts and Indians, 
Rapids, mountains, cold, 

Furnished tales of danger 
Met and proudly told. 

Dangers and great sorrow 
People brave and win; 

Trifles like mosquitoes 
Wear the courage thin. 



MAY 1967 



187 



The Divine Dialogue 



PART ]l 



BY REED H. BRADFORD 



In Part I of the discussion of the divine dialogue 
it was indicated that: (1) its aim is to discover the 
truth and its meaning for all the individuals in- 
volved, (2) its motivation is positive, (3) all indi- 
viduals engaged in it have a genuine respect for one 
another, (4) there is always a genuine attempt to 
reach a consensus or common understanding, (5) 
everyone keeps the "big picture" in mind by remem- 
bering that any action or discussion will affect not 
only the individuals immediately involved but every 
life touched by them, and (6) everyone strives to 
have the Spirit of the Lord and the influence of the 
Holy Ghost to be with him. 

So that we might more clearly understand the 
meaning of such a dialogue and how we can apply 
it individually in our daily lives, let us consider some 
examples. 

In June, 1844, the enemies of the Prophet Joseph 
Smith were seeking his destruction. He held con- 
sultations with several important individuals con- 
cerning the action to be taken at this critical mo- 
ment. At one of these conferences a letter from 
General Ford of Illinois was read. The governor 
suggested that Joseph and others be taken from 
Nauvoo to Carthage to be tried. But Joseph said: 
"There is no mercy — no mercy here." 

His brother Hyrum replied: "No; just as sure 
as we fall into their hands we are dead men." 

"Yes: what shall we do, Brother Hyrum?" asked 
Joseph. 

Hyrum answered, "I don't know." 

All at once the Prophet's countenance brightened 
up and he said, "The way is open. It is clear to my 
mind what to do. All they want is Hyrum and my- 
self; then tell everybody to go about their business, 
and not to collect in groups, but to scatter about. 
There is no doubt they will come here and search 
for us. Let them search; they will not harm you in 
person or property, and not even a hair of your head. 
We will cro^s the river tonight, and go away to the 
West.' 

They did cross the river, and the next morning 
the governor's posse arrived in Nauvoo to arrest the 



(For Course 7, lesson of July 23, "Prophets Direct the Church"; 
for Course 9, lesson of July 23, "A Leader Seeks the Kingdom of 
God"; for Course 13, lessons of July 2 and 16, "Helps to Safety and 
Happiness" and "Detours"; for Course 15, lesson of July 30, "Shib- 
lon"; for Course 25, lessons of June 18 and 25 and July 2, "Matur- 
ing the Emotions," "Human Relationships," and "Towards Spiritual 
Maturity"; for Course 29, lessons of June 4 and July 23, "Candi- 
dates for Godhood" and "Road to Salvation and Exaltation"; to 
support family home evening lesson 25; and of general interest.) 

iJoseph Fielding Smith, Essentials in Church History; Deseret 
News Press, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1922; page 373. 



Prophet. Their inability to find him angered the 
men, and they informed the people that if he did 
not give himself up troops would be sent into the 
city to guard it until he was found. 

Some of the prophet's associates sent word to 
him, entreating him to return. Some of those thought 
to be his friends accused him of cowardice for hav- 
ing left the people and indicated that their property 
would be destroyed. 

The persecutions of enemies were easy to bear, 
but when he was thus accused by those who should 
have been his dearest friends, the Prophet was stung 
to the quick. It was not for himself he sought safety, 
but for his people. If this was all they cared, he 
would not seek to save himself. He replied: "If my 
life is of no value to my friends, it is of none to 
myself.""-' 

On the morning of June 24, Joseph, Hyrum, 
some accused members of the Nauvoo city council, 
and some trusted friends left for Carthage. "On the 
way the Prophet hesitated, and looked back with 
admiration upon the city, the temple, and his farm. 
'This is the loveliest place, and the best people imder 
the heavens'; he said. . . ."^ 

This was the behavior of a man who was in divine 
communication with the Lord. Although he was 
saddened by the actions of his enemies and those 
who were supposed to be his friends, he had a deep 
peace that came from two sources: his Heavenly 
Father and his own conscience. What greater com- 
pliment could come to any man than to know that 
his Father in heaven approved of his behavior? 

Human beings are often immature. They are 
governed by their passions and are insensitive to 
their own eternal welfare and to the welfare of oth- 
ers. Frequently they are unjust in their treatment 
of others. But not so with the divine Creator. He is 
all-wise, intelligent, understanding, and loving. He 
can be trusted always. It was the Lord who said, 
"I, the Lord, am bound when ye do what I say. . . ." 
(Doctrine and Covenants 82: 10.) And again He said: 

Therefore, fear not, little flock; do good; let earth 
and hell combine against you, for if ye are built upon 
my rock, they cannot prevail. (Doctrine and Cove- 
nants 6: 34.) 

Similarly, there is no higher approbation than to 
know that one has used his intelligence, his time. 



^Joseph Fielding Smith, Essentials in Church History, page 374. 
^Joseph Fielding Smith, Essentials in Church History, page 375. 



188 



THE I NSTRUCTOR 



and his energy in honestly trying to achieve the goals 
outlined for him by his Heavenly Father. This is 
the approval of one's conscience. In The Story of the 
Other Wise Man, Henry Van Dyke tells the story 
of Artaban, who searched for 33 years to find the 
Savior. Artaban barely missed the Savior several 
times because the wise man paused to show love and 
mercy to his fellow human beings: 

. . . What had he to live for? He had given away 
the last remnant of his tribute for the King. He had 
parted with the last hope of finding Him. The quest 
was over, and it had failed. But even in that thought, 
accepted and embraced, there was peace. It was not 
resignation. It was not submission. It was some- 
thing more profound and searching. He knew that 
all was well, because he had done the best that he 
could, from day to day. He had been true to the 
light that had been given to him. He had looked 
for more. And if he had not found it . . . doubtless 
that was the best that was possible . . . he knew 
that even if he could live his earthly life over again, 
it could not be otherwise than it had been.^ 

This was the kind of life the Prophet Joseph 
lived. He carried on a divine dialogue with his Heav- 
enly Father. Having done this, he was able to in- 
spire men and women and children to participate 
in such a dialogue with him. True, he could not do 
this with all individuals but only because some would 
not meet the requisite conditions. But he tried. And 
thus he was able to conclude his earthly mission with 
these words: 

. . . I am going like a lamb to the slaughter; 
but I am calm as a summer's morning; I have a 
conscience void of offense towards God, and towards, 
all men. . . . (Doctrine and Covenants 135:4.) 

Is there any better way to conclude one's life? 



A woman once contemplated marrying a man 
with a number of outstanding qualities but who was 
unable to manage his emotions. He had been reared 
in a home dominated by his father, a man who had 
been very successful in many positions in his com- 
munity and church. Possessed of great ability, the 
father considered it proper to make decisions for his 
wife and children in most aspects of life. This had 
irritated the son but he could find no successful 
way to break the pattern. This had produced a feel- 
ing of inferiority in him. Because of his inability to 
manage his emotions, he vented on others the re- 
sentment he felt toward his father. 

The woman pondered this decision a long time. 
She knew that because he wanted to marry her, 
the man tried hard to control his temper when he 
was with her. But what would it be like after the 



wedding? Would she be able to help him actualize 
or fulfill his potentials? 

After evaluating the whole situation, she finally 
decided to marry him. She then presented this ten- 
tative decision to the Lord and asked Him if it was 
a good decision. She received an affirmation that it 
was. She married the man. 

She asked the Lord for strength to help her be 
mature when her husband was immature. She also 
prayed that her husband would understand her and 
her weaknesses. 

At first their marriage went rather well. But 
gradually the husband began to manifest the same 
reaction toward her as he did toward others. He 
became irritated and raised his voice when he dis- 
agreed with something she had said or done. The 
wife realized that if she lost control of her emotions 
and exhibited similar behavior toward him, she prob- 
ably would lose the opportunity of producing a de- 
sirable change in him. 

Finally, one day after he had not only raised 
his voice but also shouted at her, she put on her 
coat and left the house, crying. It was the turning 
point in their marriage. He felt her sorrow and 
realized his own responsibility in causing it. He not 
only asked her forgiveness but also requested her 
help. "You must love me very much not to treat 
me the way I've treated you," he said. With the 
help of a counselor, their relationship improved 
greatly. 

This is not to imply that all the immaturity was 
on the side of the husband. It was not. But the 
ability of the wife to manage her emotions was a 
big factor in changing one area of his behavior. 
From then on they were able to communicate with 
one another with greater consideration. The occa- 
sions when he crossed the sensitive line in their re- 
lationships became fewer and fewer. Their dialogues 
one with another became more meaningful and pro- 
ductive. 

This case illustrates that each of us, in a sense, 
can become creators of "divine dialogues." By ex- 
hibiting mature behavior toward his children a par- 
ent provides a model which may help them to 
become mature. 



Acquiring the kind of relationships with others 
implied in the concept of a divine dialogue may 
take time. But the price paid is small in comparison 
to the joy received when all of one's efforts tend 
to be productive of intellectual, emotional, social, 
and spiritual growth. 



*Henry Van Dyke, The Story of the Other Wise Man, Harper & 
Brothers Publishers, New York, N.Y., 1923; pages 74, 75. 



Library File Reference: HUMAN RELATIONS. 



MAY 1967 



189 









Trailblazers 
In Mexico 



by Nelle S. Hatch'' 

A pioneer is a trailblazer — one who pushes into 
unknown country and marks a path for others to 
follow. He selects a spot where both water and land 
are available and begins a settlement. While doing 
so, he scouts the country to discover hazards to his 
selected spot, such as Indians, wild animals, or other 
menaces; then he removes them or prepares for pro- 
tection against them. He starts to clear ground and 
erect permanent buildings. Favorable aspects like 
good neighbors, good hunting, and means of expan- 
sion are cultivated. 

The western United States was settled by such 
intrepid pioneers. Not only did they open new terri- 
tory and become instrumental in building commu- 
nities that grew into cities, but they founded 
industries and facilities for communication and 
transportation and built schools and churches. 

Although the Mormon pioneers in Mexico 
had these same objectives, their situation was un- 
usual in many ways. They were in a foreign land, 
where they had to meet immigration restrictions, 
learn the customs and language of the people, and 
adjust to new laws governing the country in which 
they had chosen to live. Full credit for the scouting 
and original settlement belongs to those on the 
vanguard. Yet part of the glory rightfully belongs 
to those who followed the trail already partly blazed. 
My father. Alma Platte Spilsbury, was one of the 
followers. 





THE STRAWBERRY RANCH 



He entered Mexico 
in 1891. Colonia Juarez was 
a settlement five years old, and 
the lot assigned to him had all the elements 
of pioneering. He was to care for the Church cattle, 
on shares, on the Strawberry Ranch, 25 miles south- 
west of Colonia Juarez in the heart of the Sierra 
Madre Mountains. To get his family, wagons, house- 
hold necessities, and livestock there, he had to find a 
way through the San Diego Canyon, which posed a 
formidable barrier. After weeks of work, a dugway 
road was buttressed against the solid cliffs. A great 
rock hump near the top had to be blasted again and 
again to level it enough for passage. On a previous 
trip Father had spent his strength on it, and it had 
been made passable enough for a sawmill to haul out 
lumber. Over this precarious dugway and "camel's 
hump" Father took the family during November 
1891, and settled us on the Strawberry Ranch. For 
eight years this was our home. 

A log cabin, a cheese-house, and a cellar were 
already built; but all else needed for making a live- 
Uhood Father had to build by himself. The cattle 
were scattered over a 25-mile range, with no fences 
to control their wandering. It took constant riding 
to get them used to the range boundaries. It was 
a lark for us children, from age one to 11 years, 
to romp over the valley, discover the beautiful spring 
of pure mountain water, and find snail shells in the 
low cliffs. It was exciting to climb the cliffs and 
find the "white rock forest" that terrified us with 
its ghostly formations of animals and monsters. 

But to Mother it was a lonely and potentially 
dangerous spot. The Apache Kid and his renegade 
offshoots of Geronimo's band of Indians were in the 
hills. They had raided a few isolated camps, killed 
a prospector or two, stolen horses, and had so terri- 

(For Course la, lesson of June 11, "Making New Homes"; for 
Course 7, lessons of July 9, "What It Means To Be a Pioneer" and 
"The Pioneers in Your Family"; for Course 9, lessons of June 4 and 
25, "A Leader Has Courage" and "A Leader Honors His Parents"; 
for Course 11, lessons of June 25. "Irrigation" and "The Importance 
of Livestock"; for Course 25, lesson of July 16, "Tests and Trials"; 
to support family home evening lessons 25 and 26; and of general 
interest.) 

*Nelle S. Hatch is a daughter of Alma P. and Mary Jane Redd 
Spilsbury. She was born in Mesa, Arizona. The family moved to 
the Mormon colonies in Mexico, where Sister Hatch grew up and 
was married to Ernest I. Hatch. They have three children. Sister 
Hatch is a member of the Juarez Ward, Juarez (Mexico) Stake. 
The article was written with the aid of her daughter, Ernestine 
Hatch. 



190 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



fied the Mexicans that they would not go into the 
mountains for any purpose. 

I was four years old when we moved to the ranch 
and 12 when we were forced to leave because of a 
deluge that washed away the ranch holdings. Being 
so young I did not realize at the time the serious 
nature of my mother's worries, but it is all strongly 
impressed on my mind. To wake in the night and 
see her sitting up in bed, straining ears and eyes 
into the darkness, may have meant little to me 
then; but now mature understanding gives me an 
awareness of what she suffered. 

Father went about his work cheerfully, break- 
ing a couple of steers into oxen to drag poles down 
from the sloping hillside for corrals, bams, and out- 
buildings, with no other help than my seven-year- 
old brother. There were two sisters older than I 
and two younger. It seemed that all Father's boys 
were girls, so we were pressed into doing the work 
of the boys. "We have to be ready for milking when 
the rainy season brings grass to fatten the cows," 
Father would inform us. He made periodic trips to 
the valley for supplies, leaving us alone several days 
and nights at a time. AU that first spring and sum- 
mer we were preparing for that milking season. We 
planted corn and potatoes and made cheese to sell. 

The planting, hoeing, and harvesting of the po- 
tatoes was a job for the entire family. Mother care- 
fully cut the seed potatoes so there would be an eye 
in each piece to be dropped into the arrow-straight 
furrows Father plowed. Later, weeding seemed to 
be an endless job. When harvest time came we again 
followed Father down each row as the plow turned 
up the white potatoes for us to put into piles, later 
to be carried into the cellar. My sister voiced the 
sentiment of all when she said she wished the po- 
tatoes had legs instead of eyes so they could walk 
to the cellar by themselves. 

One day as Father was preparing the land to 
plant potatoes, he flooded it with canal water car- 
ried from the dam he had built on the creek. As 
the water flooded over the land we screamed, for 
with it came a wriggling water snake. "Don't be 
afraid of that little fellow," Father said comfortingly. 
"Here, I'll get him out of the way." Getting the 
snake coiled onto his shovel, Father threw it over the 
fence where it slithered into the water. 

"Little fellows like that won't hurt you," he said, 
"but keep your eyes open for a rattler. His strike 
is quick and deadly. Keep your ears open, too, for 
he'll never strike without warning. He's one fellow 
I've promised never to kill." 

And then he told us how in his early married life 
he had seen a rattler coiled by the side of his Uttle 
boy asleep in the field. He had watched, afraid to 



snatch the child to safety or to try killing the snake 
for fear of increasing the danger to his son. Finally, 
he said, "Old fellow, if you leave that child un- 
harmed, I'll never harm you nor any of your kind." 
He watched breathlessly as the snake uncoiled and 
crawled away. He never allowed us to kill snakes. 
After the summer rains, many grass-fattened 
cows with their young calves were rounded into the 
corral. Calves were locked in their pens, and the 
wild cows were tamed to stand while a quart or two 
of milk was squirted into the bucket. Soon mother's 
No. 3 tub on the kitchen stove was filled with milk 
each morning. Using milkweed seed for the rennet, 
the milk was heated until it curdled. Mother cut 
the curdled milk with a butcher knife, then skilfully 
worked the curds with her fingers. When the curd 
was exactly the right firmness, the tub was removed 
from the heat. Mother continued to stir and mix 
until the whey was out of the curds. These were 
then salted and pressed into a cloth-lined metal hoop, 
with a fitted wooden lid, or press. The hoop was 
placed on a corrugated board, called a "follower"; 
and the lid was pressed gently but firmly down 
against the curds until all the whey was gone. Then 
the hoop was placed between two planks, the ends 
of which were secured firmly into the chinks of the 
rock chimney. A heavy rock was suspended from the 
top plank at the outer end, and it was moved closer 
into the chimney as the pressing progressed. When 
the mixture was dry of whey, it was left to "set" 
until the next morning, when it was removed and 
placed on a shelf until dry, then covered with cheese- 
cloth and set away to cure. This cured cheese bought 
shoes, school books, and food for the winter. 

When the first milking season had ended, my 
eldest sister was the only one Father could afford 
to send to school. She had just left with a neighbor 
for Colonia Juarez when a rider came galloping into 
the yard to tell us that Indians had killed some of 
the Thompson family at the Williams Ranch, about 
six miles north of us. The mother was shot and 
killed and two boys were shot. One was dead. All 
ranchers were advised to go to the nearest settle- 
ment for safety. My mother's face blanched at 
this news. She glanced quickly in the direction her 
eldest daughter had just taken, and we aU won- 
dered if the Indians would get her, too. My father's 
face paled also, but he calmly answered, "The dan- 
ger was yesterday, not today. If the Indians came 
from the north and disappeared in the same direc- 
tion, as you say, they're too far away by now to do 
us any harm." We children stayed on the ranch alone 
while Mother and Father attended the funeral. 

Ranchers in the mountains faced dangers from 

(Concluded on following page.) 



MAY 1967 



191 




CHEESE PRESS USED 
AT STRAWBERRY RANCH 



TRAILBLAZERS IN MEXICO (Concluded from preceding page.) 

other sources, too. Word came one day from Pache- 
00, six miles to the west, where a few famihes were 
beginning a colony, of the killing of Hyrum Naegle, 
a relative of my father's. Two brothers, George and 
Hyrum Naegle, tracked a wounded bear which had 
killed many of their calves and young colts. Hyrum, 
following the trail of blood the bear left, was onto 
it before he realized. The wounded animal, taken 
by surprise, charged before Hyrum could raise his 
gun to shoot. Before George caught up with him, the 
bear had severely mangled Hyrum. George admin- 
istered to him, and he lived to be carried a mile and 
a half to their ranch house, where his wounds were 
washed and bandaged. Then he was held on his 
horse and led fifteen miles to Pacheco; but he died. 
Again we were left by ourselves while Father and 
Mother attended this funeral. Hyrum's wife gave 
birth to a baby girl a few months later. 

Mexicans were afraid to enter the hills because 
of the Indians, but a few began to pass by the 
ranch after seeing we were "staying put" in spite of 
danger. One day while Father was away and Mother 
was alone with us children, our only male protector 
being my ten-year-old brother, four ugly fellows rode 
into the yard asking for the "patron." 

They winked at each other when Mother bravely 
told them Father was away but would soon return. 
Instead of riding away, they made for the bam, 
which was well-filled with wild hay and began gen- 
erously feeding their horses. Mother and Lem cou- 
rageously marched over to ask them to please leave 
the hay alone. They laughed at her and led their 
horses to the shade of the huge cedar tree in our 
yard, where they proceeded to unsaddle them and 
make a campfire. Besides warming their coffee and 
heating beans and tortillas for their evening meal, 
they began passing around a bottle of "sotol" and 
became uproariously drunk. 

As evening drew near, Mother gathered us around 
her in the bedroom. Before she could tell us what 
to do, however, we heard a team and wagon. We 



In final stage of pioneer cheese making, 
the hoop full of cheese was placed be- 
tween two planks, firmly chinked into 
the chimney. A heavy rock, suspended 
from the top plank, was moved closer 
as pressing dried out the cheese. 



ran to the door, then to the gate, to meet our 
neighbor and ask him to stay the night. But the 
man was in a hurry to take a wagon wheel to his 
wife who was stranded on Cedar Flat. We under- 
stood and sadly watched him drive away. 

"Well, the Lord can help us," Mother said, as 
she led us again into the bedroom. With us kneel- 
ing around her she simply asked the Lord to be 
merciful and protect us. Before she could say 
"Amen," we again heard a team and wagon. It was 
the same neighbor explaining that the canyon above 
us was filled with campfires and he would have to 
stay with us after all. 

Our neighbor's second appearance was enough 
to scare the drunken trespassers away. Angrily they 
saddled their horses and were soon on their way. 
Mother always said she knew the Lord had magni- 
fied the glistening fireflies in the canyon to resemble 
campfires so that the man would return to protect us. 

In between such scares, we had peaceful evenings 
around the blazing fireplace, and time for Mother 
to share with us her girlhood Ufe in Utah. From 
these stories we all came to know her parents and 
grandparents, her brother and sisters and cousins 
so well that when I met them later in life, I knew 
all about them. 

The words "Gospel," "joining the Church," and 
other terms Mother used as she told of her grand- 
parents' conversion, of their "belief in the truth as 
soon as they heard it," were not meaningful to me 
then. But the reverent way in which she spoke those 
words, and her hallowed look when she described 
the hardships and trials her people had endured for 
the Gospel's sake, were never to be forgotten. The 
testimony that shone from her face grew more 
meaningful as the years passed; and it made me in- 
creasingly thankful that while we were proving to 
the natives of Mexico that the hills and the moun- 
tains were safe places in which to live, we were be- 
ing taught not only what it means to be a pioneer, 
but what it means to be a Mormon. 



Library FUe Reference: PIONEERS. 



192 



TH E INSTR UCTOR 



13' 

c 

Id 
o 






H O 
> 

w 
P3 









<u 



o 
G 

;h 

CD 

> 

CD 

Oh 



"d •'^ '^ CD 

^ 5 ^ 

IZl rt '-' 

c« =1 CU 

— ' 4-;^ > 

rj (D c3 

"tj a! O O 



<D CD 
Q O Oj 

C 
OS 



■Si 



C/3 
<D 
O 

c 

CD 






CD 

CD rt '^ 



'^ "G 
CD 3 



!-i CD 

^ § § S - ^ 

oj 03 ►^ O T3 



CD 


^.t; 


d 


OJ 


§2 


(J 


a 


K - 


ijt 


en 
CD 


S"^ 


c 
'x. 


^ 


a5 


a 
2 


T^ 


g . 


ilC 




5 £? 




3 
O 




J 


4— ( 


--M 


Jc 


o 


>> nj 


3> 






5 



CO 

S 6 



a X 

CD < 

!h "^ 

P G 



> >^ 

TO OS 

i-* O " 
•+■< O^ 

*j to 

O! c a 



b 

c 
o 



no 



o 

i-i 



T3! 
CD 
U 

a 
G 



w 

w 
> 

w 
p:; 



■f-H 

CD 






T3 

o 



CS 
CD 



<D 

o 
G 

(U 

u 

<D 
> 

ID 



O 

G 

QJ 
CD 

> 

CD 



CD ' 

^-4 -I-' 



CD 



<D 
u 

■G ^ 1^ 

cfl rt CD 

Mg^^G 

.S tJD CD G 
_S CD csj 

"il oj O <D 



« ;:^ G p ^ 



<u 



^G 

CO 



G >>. '^ O 

b oi Eo ;^;g 

(D O 

a 

G 
.-. =13 

(D TJ O 

!-i --iH +-> 

G 
> U)i« 

^ 'ml (D 

^ C J^i 

© s ■ ■ 

bC 5^13 



<D 

O 
G 
<D 
G 

C 



<D 
CD rt ■ 



(D 



"^ ::>. r-i 



So 
a. J. 

G cti 

CD Q, 

G 

CD 
U 



o 

ID 
CI. 

ID 
;-i 

X! 

G 
G 
O 

o 

>H ^ 

*^ (D 
to I> 



G-- 
> a; 

(D 1 — I 

05 '=^ 



■Q,K 

-a.os 
a— I 

K - 
3 & 

-a 



^ Or 









G " 



rt 03 ^ O T3 



3 to DO 
Q C B 



O 



Q. 



O 



c 

o 



o 



c 

O 
.s 

"^ I— ( 

1^ 



■ a o 

S 
o 
1-1 



T3 
CD 
u 
o 
a 

C 
cd 

O 



o o 



> 



CD 
-I-' 

O 
c3 

03 
CD 



CD 



O V3 



= ^ 



CD 

O 

c 

CD 

"<D 
> 

<D 

p:5 



S G 

CD 

S a; 

0) ti 3 c3 

■■-I -l-H O QJ 

<o 72 ^ 
^ 5 ^- 

_S <U 03 

"iJ 03 o o 



OJ >^ G O^ 

S^|^:g 



a G 



d 






T3 



CO 

(D 
O 

G 
CD 
G 
q=l 
G 



<D 
CD 



go 

CD 



!SrG 



O CD 



P 03 



a 

G 

03 

CD '"O O 

a; G 

- ^ (D 



CD 03 
J^ CD 

2 ^ 

^T3 D4 

CO -.-H 
4-1 

G 03 
S !^ 

G 
CD 
!-i 



>^45 



O 
(D 

CD 

G 
G 
O 

o 

•^ CD 

•-4 O 



8^ 

G -r; 
CD ^ 

> CD 

0) r— 4 



■CXos 

X - 
£-^ 

a - 



i*; 



5 » 



rX O r 



I oo 



03 03^ 013 



T3 C 

>'■':. 

D^ - 

ISO 
O ■" M ■ 

Q s a 



U 






o 



-J 






< 

b 

c 
o 



C 

3 

bO 





0) 

J3 




H 






're 


!h 


& 


o 


CS 


fe 


S 




o 




u 




b4 





o 

CC3 
c« 

G 
o3 

X! 

O 



o o 



<D 



•r-f ^^ 



u 

w 
p< 



(-1 

CD 

CD 
03 
u 
03 

rG 

<D 



g § 

»H 



ID 



CD 



<D 
CJ 
G 
CD 
)~i 

> 



4^ G "S 

+j t:^ oJ 

■1-4 O 

O "^"^ bC 



> <D 



CD ' 

■-I 4J 42 > 

t;/, 03 CD 

G GJD (D G 

43 03 <D O 



0) >^ G O^ 
G ■ " 





S G >, 



■ Gr^ 
C 



CO 

CD 
O 

G 

(D 

G 
C 



CD 
<D 



O 03 >^. 
H OJ 03 ' 



CD 
CD 

^^ ^ 

0) tj o 

;_ -rH 4-1 

CD G 
> bC CO 

G-g S 

Q q; cfl 



^ 03 

03 ._^ 

G o! 
<D n, 

^4 *^ 



03 03 ^ O'^ 



O 
CD 

ft 

CO 

CD 

;-! 

T3 

G 
G 

o 

o 

is - 
ft" • 

(D 
to > 

CD rH 

G X 
CD ^ 

^4 "^ 

> CD 
<D 1 — 1 

r' G 






3 £■ 

■So 

■=- u 

>■ CJ 



T3 ci . 

■-(-lOO 

ess 



S 2 



:3 vi bO 
Ct c a 



o 
U 



.J3 



o 



J 



< 
V) 

b 

c 
o 



O 



■i " 



C 

o 

.s 

-^ I— I 

•r-t 

ft o 
o 



CD 
Ui 
CJ 
03 

CO 

G 
03 



P5 



005^ 

O co^ 

C 5 "^ 

2i e 



T3 
O 



o 

OS 

03 

CD 



CD 



ID 

O 
G 

CD 
S-i 
CD 
> 
CD 



CD >^ G O^ 

^4-4 CD > 4-1 t;::1 



-G kJ-G t4 

" 73 ^ 

CD-^ ^ SJ 

.G bC CD fl 

■+3 o3 O O 



© 



H^-^ 



is 

.s3 



CO 



CO 

CJ 
O 
G 



O 

!-l rG -^ 

=^ n G 

O ° -G 

(D CJ 1^ 

C CJ OS" ■ 

'-' ;h CJ 



CJ 
o . . 

^ ts o 
G CJ G ^ 

Si^ G 

ID CJ 

G ^ 



Ci 
CJ 

.G 
H 



G 
Ci 

03 



P^-03 
- ft 

4-1 

Sh 

OJ 



CJ 



03 



bC f^Xi 






, _ G 
03 03 ^ O T3 



O 
CJ 
ft 

CO 
'T3 

C 
3 
O 

M-4 

o 

Si -, 
ft" • 

CJ 
CO > 
•« o 



CJ g 

S-i "^ 
<D TJ 

r^ G 



0-= 



CO 



U 






^ o 



S a 



■-)-iaO 

rao 



-" OS 

c= w Si 
3 



C a 



o 
U 



a 



o 

-c: 



< 
cri 

b 

.£ 
o 



s 
O 

■f—i 

03 1-1 

ft O 

re "^ 



O 



CTi 4-' 

CO .CO 

T3 CJ 

d 4-- 



OS 



o 



§ ^ 

Sa 



03 
'P 03 

O " 

MH 

55 CJ 
O "G 

CJ 
OJ 
CJ QJ 

C,^ 

CD +-• 

OJ .^ 

> 

■Y- bo 
^ G 









■*-• G 
•ti o 

•i-i 

<D 

bc CJ 



03 
CJ 
u 

bC 

CJ 

I-I 

CJ 

> 

CJ 

G 



^cj >^a o^ 







^-^ S-G 



'^ CJ 

CO 
CJ 

o 
G 
CJ 
G 

G 



go.S 

QJ O 



CJ 
CJ 

G 



;h 



CJ --a 

i_ -M 

CJ G 



03 



CJ 03 



SI ^ 
T3 ft 

QJ 2^i^ C "ti 

I-I f= G b © Qj 

03 03X! OTJ 



OJ 

ft 

to 
s-< 

13 " 

G 
. G 

O 

t-lH 

o 

>H . 
ft" • 

QJ 
CO >> 



QJ tJ 
> CJ 

QJ . — I 









-S o 



-a c ■ 

•-MOO 

> u-i 
^ -r^ 

Q'i; . 

^ TOO 

■-" o;3 

u 
Of c a 



o 
U 



a 

M 

■ bo 
o 



■J ■ j2 



00 



< 

C/3 

b 

C 
O 



■■(« 

o 

'? 



'^ l-H 

.. J3 



I 

;-i 
E14 






OJ 

Sh 

a 

03 
CO 

'IS 

G 
03 

O 



w o 

w ^ 

> CJ 

o 

G, 
CJ 

S-I 

CJ 

> 



o 2 CJ 

'r-l ^^ 



CO >-. 

CJ 



o3 

S-I 
03 

o 



G 

CJ 

s 



CJ ±i S rt 

•:2 -^4 O gj 

-^ l-l-G !-< 

CJ .ti bC 

QJP-j > CJ 

4-J O jj . 

CO 3 CJ 

CO <^ CJ 
Mg.^"G 

.S tJD S G 

"53 (rf O CJ 



,CJ >^ c o^ 
c c 



-G r^ 



CJ CO 





•5-4^ 



CO 

IV 
CJ 
G 
CJ 
G 
cd 

G 



CJ 
CJ 
I-I 

rG 



v^pG 

)H pJG '^ 

go.S 

QJ P 



CD 03 >^j 

5 Q O 03" 



f=_2 ^ 
i_ -^ +J 
QJ G 
> bC i« 

fl G ^ 



CJ 



Qi 



a 



U CJ 

^% 

'TJ ft 

f* •'H 
4-1 

G 03 

2^ a 



^ }_l >^rG _i4 

03 03 r^ O 13 



0) 

ft 

CO 
QJ 

G 



O 

ft" • 

CJ 

CO > 

•« O 



G ■'"' 

0) ^ 

CJ 173 
> CJ 

QJ >— I 



•C1.0 



la 



Ni- 



-S o 



•-1— 100 

CO On 

«tfiiw 

° ■'" SI 

M fo bfi 

U! c a 



o 
U 

c 

a 



o 

J2 



j3 



< 

b 

c 



C 

■£ 

o 

c g 

:? I 

< 2 

'^ l—t 

re ii 

ft o 

re '^ 



o 



n3 

QJ 
!h 

o 

CO 
T3 

w o 

Pm CJ 

Sh 
QJ 
> 

PC 



^4H 1 >. 

o corS 



Sh 

<D 
4-' 

O 
03 

Sh 
03 

O 



O! 

s 

G 
CJ 



_2 4-- ■ 

CJ iJ ? 03 

•-4 .^ O QJ 

'^ j rG ^H 

CJ ^ bC 

.QJ.P-4 > QJ 

■*-' o jj , 

CO 4* '-I 

CO G CJ 

U)g.^"G 

.S tJOcj G 

(3 CJ oi 

43 OS O CJ 



,QJ >^ G O^ 



CJ 



03 ' 



o P 5? ^;G 

■ Sh ^ -^ 

^ n G 
ej O O .^ 

■O - - 
G ^rG 
-4 o 
CJ cci 

C 
03 



.s:g 



CO 

QJ 

O 
G 
CJ 
G 

■ G 



Sh 

03" - 
U 






n3 

^ 'G 

CJ G - . 

> bC^to S q 

2^ G 
T3 CJ 

G H 



CJ 
CJ 

ft 

CO 

CJ' 
Ih 

Xi 

G 
G 
O 
1+4 
O 

!h „ 

ft" - 

QJ 

CO ►> 



X) ft 



I ^J —i \^ 

'4-1 rt -fh 



G 

CJ 



G OS 



.r^ 03 



0) 



<s 



bJO ftx! 



>^kG 



QJ Q, 
Sh "^ 

G 
CJ 



■C1.0 

X . 

la 

^« 
.^-^ 
«jj 
1^ 



^ o 



CJ-S 

G X 
^ 

CJXI 

> 

1 — I 

?^ G 



03 03 r^ O 'T3 



E yrs. 
^ oS 

° •^■' K, 
Ct c a 



o 
O 



a 

BO 

o 






< 
c/i 

b 

c 

o 
X 



o 
.s s 

"^ I— ( 

re u 
ft o 
re *** 

s 

o 

Ih 

fa 




'i^^^^^l 


^^^Hh 


\£t^ 


' 1 £i -^P^III^^^^^^^^S* ^ 








TWBHj 


^^^^^^^^^^H^^HHi' 






^^^■1 ' ^V 



M 

o 



'> 
a 

Q 

-M 
CO 

(D 









1 


>. 




a 


|HB 


^ .- 


^ 


" "^l 


^ 


S ' 


■ 


O 


^m 


^ tl 


_-#*••*' 


•r-l '^ 


"i**^^ 
^ 


> 



CD 



Hill Cumorali Pageant 

How A Pageant Opened The Dcx>rs Of A City 

BY Charles W. Whitman* 

Even before the Book of Mormon was off the press, churches, civic organiza- 
tions, and other groups in Palmyra, New York, had passed resolutions forbidding 
their members either to purchase the book or to accept it as a gift.^ This suggests in 
a mild way how Joseph Smith and his Book of Mormon were received. In light of 
the religious revival taking place in the town of Palmyra in 1819, it is easy to under- 
stand that the account of visits of a heavenly being to Joseph Smith would not be 
readily acceptable in that area. On April 2, 1830, in an issue of the paper which 
preceded the Rochester, New York, Democrat and Chronicle, the following item of 
history was recorded about Mormonism and Joseph Smith: 

He was not only lazy and indolent, hut also intemperate, and his word was not 
to be depended upon. We are truly glad to dispense with their society. The Book of 
Mormon has been placed in our hands; a viler imposition was never practiced. It is 
an evidence of fraud, blasphemy, shocking to Christian and non'Christian alike.^ 

This feeling of hostility toward the Mormons was still prevalent in 1937 and 
was one of the reasons that Eastern States Mission President Don B. Colton organ- 
ized a pageant to be presented on the side of the Hill Cumorah. President Colton 
felt such a presentation would enable the surrounding communities to see and come 
to understand more fully the Mormons' belief in the mission of Jesus Christ. Elder 
Harold I. Hansen, a missionary, was named director of the pageant. He has directed 
it each year since that time. Dr. Hansen recalls that after the close of the first 
pageant, he and his companion tried to rent a roomi in Palmyra. At length they 
were welcomed by a truly Christian woman, although of unsavory reputation, who 
rented them a room. Dr. Hansen relates: 



1 Willard Bean, A. B. C, History of Palmyra and the Beginning of "MormonisTn;" Palmyra-Courier Company, 
Inc., Palmyra, N. Y., 1938; page 67. 

2 "A Testimony," by Harold I. Hansen, address given at Southern California Leadership Week, August 26, 1958, 
unpublished, page 6. 

*Charles W. Whitman is an assistant professor at Brigham Young University, Department of Dramatic Art, and 
former assistant director of the Hill Cumorah pageant. He has worked professionally in well-known, little-theatre enter- 
prises in Minnesota, Oregon, Dallas, and Cleveland. He is a convert to the Church. He earned degrees from BYU 
(B.A. 1957; M.A. 1958) and is writing a PhD thesis on the Pageant. He married Dorothy Whittaker; they are 
parents of five children and are members of Sunset Third Ward, West Utah Stake. 






J '- 



p " ?. 



^*i 





















S'^ 



.t^-^r^;.-^ 






■'LI'-'* -V 



















ilte^v of Robert R. MuHen & Co., 'v^'sishiisfiloii, D. C. 

1. Herald trumpeters open the pageant. 



2. King Mosiah blesses Alma the younger. 3. Samuel the Lamanite prophesies of the co 

HILL CUMOR 



r*/v 



::j%'-^>i'^ 






Sin- 



4ii^*<i 



agpr'* 






^-i ^ -, 



■» 


■nifm 


1 ^#' 


Rl 


■ 


? 


1 


jr! 


^ 




mm_:^t 


^c ?7 





fi^A?. 



^; 











l^^^^^r^jH^ 


IS^nEH^Hil^u.. ** 






1 r, m ^i^r •all i ;-^Hfcr 



■■*» 






J'f^ v/'-iv 






*.4tl 



»^^ 



i:5*a 



•^\ 



r/ 



W r. 



Ii 



ming of Christ. 4. The birth of Jesus is portrayed. 

AH PAGEANT 






t.fc^l 



Mt ^ 



/ 







Montage prepared! and reproduced for THE INSTRUCTOR by Wheelwright Litho, Lf,S,A. 



5* General Moroni confers with his captains. 



Hill Cumorali Pageant 



I learned in one short month, how much good 
there can be in the had, and how much bad there 
can be in the good. I found charity where I ex- 
pected none. The conduct of that woman was 
beyond reproach in regards to my companion and 
myself. The kind of attention that she gave us will 
stand to her credit throughout all time. I know 
what it was to have an alderman of the same viU 
lage say, when we asked to rent the electrical and 
sound equipment of the village, 'T would rather 
personally break it with a hammer than allow you 
people to touch it."^ 

The pageant was not presented during World 
War II. In 1948, when it was revived, the Palmyra 
townspeople opened their doors (and in a very 
real sense, their hearts) to the missionary partici- 
pants. Today the townspeople house not only the 
pageant participants but also countless Mormons 
and non-Mormons who come to view the spec- 
tacle. 

In 1949, when President McKay (then a coun- 
selor to President George Albert Smith) was in 
Palmyra for the dedication of a new chapel, he 
commicnted, "Joseph Smith has come home."^ 
The change in the attitude of the Palmyra area 
residents towards the Mormons and their pageant 
is certainly indicative that this statement is true. 
In 1951 this item appeared in the Rochester Dem.- 
ocrat and Chronicle: 

It is a tribute to the spiritual texture of the 
Rochester area that a religious pageant can out- 
draw the most ballyhooed sports or professional 
entertainment event. We turn to the annual Mor- 
mon Pageant at the Hill Cumorah . . . as a case in 
point. 

If history repeats, up to one hundred thousand 
people will see the dramatization of events record- 
ed in the Book of Mormon. ... 

The spectacle is a production in the deepest 
sense of the word. The same words — lighting, 
sound, costumes, stage crews, cues, music — that 
bounce around back stage in the professional the- 
ater are familiar to pageant officials. But there 
is a difference. That of motive: Therein lies the 
key to the magnetic quality of the pageant. Its basic 
purpose is to deliver a message keyed to a better 
life.^ 

This miessage "keyed to a better life" came 
directly from the Book of Mormon and is part 



of the active Latter-day Saint's life. Yet in 1830, 
this same paper called the Book of Mormon "an 
evidence of fraud, blasphemy, shocking to Chris- 
tian and non-Christian alike." 

It has taken his death and more than one hun- 
dred years of passing time to vindicate Joseph 
Smith. But the Gospel which he restored to earth 
has weathered the most difficult of times and 
brought forth wholesome, good fruit. The young 
men and women who participate in the pageant — 
whom the citizens of Palmyra are eager now to 
take into their homes — are identical in breed- 
ing, education, and belief to those missionaries 
of 1937-1941 who, of necessity, slept in barns 
and haylofts. 

The following full-page advertisement, paid 
for by 41 merchants representing all types of busi- 
nesses, indicates the warmth with which Mormons 
now are yearly welcomed to Palmyra: 

Pageant time 1963, and with it comes the op- 
portunity to express our "thanks" to the hundreds 
of Mormons and their thousands of visitors who 
convene in our community to conduct and witness 
the annual spectacle. 

Thank you for the dignity and prominence you 
have given Palmyra in carrying the message of your 
faith throughout the world, citing our conimunity 
as the birthplace of the Mormon Movement. 

And further, for the courtesy you show us in- 
dividually in respecting our streets, our business 
establishments, and our homes. 

We admire your principles and your strict ob- 
servance of church tenets. 

We're glad to see you here!^ 



3 "A Testimony," by Harold I. Hansen, pages 4, 5. 

4 Mrs, Walter Boyd, Palmyra, N. Y., unpublished letter, dated 
March 27, 1964. 

5 Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, N. Y.). July, 1958. Used by 
permission. 



6 Palmyra Courier-Journal (New York), August 8, 1963; page 1. 
Used by permission. 

(For Course la, lesson of May 7, "Our Church Is Growing"; for 
Course 5, lesson of July 9, "Peacemakers"; for Course 7, lesson of 
July 16, "Making the Church Stronger"; for Course 11, lesson of 
June 18, "Early Drama in the Church"; for Course 13, lesson of 
May 28, "How the Gospel Spreads"; for Course 19, lesson of July 30, 
"Religious Liberty and Toleration"; for Course 29, lesson of July 2, 
"True Church, A Missionary Church"; to support family home even- 
ing lesson 18; and of general interest.) 

Library File Reference: HILL CUMORAH. 
Photo subjects in the numbered pictures are: 

1. 1961, 1. to r., Jay Ashton, Inkom, Idaho; Joel Justensen, 
Lancaster, California; Douglas Castleton, Malad, Idaho; 
and Frederic D. Whitney, Anaheim, California. 

2. 1961, I. to r., Jerry Huish, Sandy, Utah; Clyde Forbes, 
Unionville, Missouri; LaDonna Noyes, Ephraim, Utah; 
Arnold Jameson, Syracuse, New York. 

3. 1962, Ivan Crossland, Provo, Utah. 

4. 1960, photo by Werner Wolff. Subjects not identified. 

5. 1961, 1. to r., Terry Fullmer, Driggs, Idaho; captains not 
identified. 



Si 
O 

OJ 

in 
a 

o. 



u 
> 



o o^ 

-pH ^^ 

C 2 CJ 

a:* S G 



Va q; ^ 4^TG 
<D^-S G^ 



CJ 

G 

(U 

t-i 

QJ 
> 
QJ 



^ ri QJ 




»-, 0) ^ 






^ ^ ^ 




^-1 


-M 


.^ ._ o 


Q) 


rf J.G 


Sh 


o .+- 


tiC 


CD--" ^ 

-^5 


QJ 


Xi 


T3 O jj 




•i-H ^ ^ 


> 


C« ^ 





.S w) <ij 


G 


G 


-2- ^ 


c3 


O 



S c 



Ki 



K*^ *I-H 



O <U Zn 



pJ=l rQ 



!-<,£: 
^ 






Qi 
CJ 

G 
QJ 



C 



o 

CJ 






G .-C 



QJ 
>^. 
(U OS " . 

^H QJ 

O '-^ cS 



0) O oj 

CJ G ' 

QJ T3 O 

^ "G -^ 
QJ G 

> bOi" 

^.^ C 

G^ £^ 

oj 5 '^ 






>>.G 



So 

Co -1-1 
4-1 

G rt 

G 
OJ 



a 

QJ 

CO 

QJ 
f-i 

G 
G 

o 



o 

Pk" ■ 

QJ 



1^ 

QJTJ 
> QJ 

QJ I— I 



a: - 



nl 



la 



w' 



.i^ O r 



-13 C . 

■-I— 100 



^ Q^ 



03 03 piO O T3 



S a 



WON 

U5P4 rvi 

° '^■' Si, 



O 

U 






o 

j3 



BO 



< 

or) 

D 

g 

o 



S 

o 

.s ® 

>> ss 



ctf 


Ui 


a 


o 


oj 


fo 


a 




o 




!h 




fc 





T3 

QJ 
O 

a 

in 

T3 

G 
oJ. 

^3 
O 



u 
P5 



O CJ S' 

C 53 Q 

QJ g 

" G 
0) 



03 
U 
03 

CJ 



QJ ■ 



QJ 
O 
G 
QJ 
Si 
QJ 
> 



QJ +J ^ OJ 

■« S J* 

■'-' +j piD > 

t/3 03 QJ 

.5 bO 0) G 

^ QJ 03 

41 cS CJ O 



QJ >-, G O^ 

^ QJ ^ •*-':g 



QJ 



Vi 



o <D ^^:g 

go.S 



I— I 



t/5 

O 

G 

G 

G 



CJ ctf P^"- 

C Q) fS" • 

H ^ ^M QJ 



QJ 
CJ 

!=!* ^ 
QJT3 O 

Si -^i -M 
Q> G 
> bO "5 



QJ 

Si 



QJ 



Si ^ 



Q^ G 



"^ OS 

03 .y 



G 
QJ 



G 03 
2^ P. 



Z3 QJ 
_ § ^ ^ 

H ^ bc f^2 G 

03 cti P^ O TJ 



O 
QJ 
P( 

QJ 
Si 

c 

G 
O 

=41 

o 

5l r. 





1^ 

QJ 
Si 

QJ ns 

^P^ 



•§■2 
X - 



rt 



a - 

"J 



pS o 



^ Q 



u 
•X) c 

CO ^r 



O '^ ^r. 

Q c a 



o 
O 



P. 



o 



< 

en 

c 

o 



C 

o 
.S S 

>^ S5 

•^ I— I 



a o 



o 

Ih 



QJ 

Si 

O 

03 

G 

03 



o o 



tf Si 

P5 



cti 
03 

CJ 







^pT: 



a 



QJ 
CJ 

c 

OJ 
Si 
QJ 
> 
QJ 
Si 



* I I f— 1 



QJ ' 

r-1 -I-' 



0) 

a 
G 

QJ 
V-i 

QJ 
> 
QJ 



o '^^ bO 

QJ'-G i ti> 

Cfl G QJ 

-H 4^^ > 

M 1^ Q> 

.S bOQj G 

rH Q> CTi 

+3 03 CJ CJ 



>. G O ^ 



QJ 

a c 

O OJ 

p^p^ 

C/3 G 

OJ -G 

§- 

QJ 

G 

OP) 

G 



■" !i _fl 

§ o.S 

QJ O 



CJ 

c 

03 



Si 

03 >N^ 

QJ o! ^ 



QJ T3 

!i 



QJ 

Q) 

Si 

pt: 



^ QJ 

§■" 

Co -n 

■M 

-r Bi 

03 



H^ 



G 
bC^ 

+3 QJ 

g; Oi t- 1-4 



bJO P^TS c 
ctf cd p£2 CJ "TJ 



CJ 

QJ 

QJ 
ti 

T3 
G 
G 
O 

Ml 

o 

Si ^ 
Pi" ■ 
QJ 



Si 

QJi-O 
> QJ 
Q) , — I 









W' 



P^ O r 



^ Q' 






cdON 

ess 
■^'^^ 

° '"^ !i 

Jit 'J a 
Of C G 



o 

u 

at 
c 

a 



o 

J3 



pC 

till 






c/i 

D 

c 
o 



a 


•M 

S ^ 

a o 

s 

o 
u 



T3' 
Q) 
!l 

o 

03 

•^ 9 

W O 

PH 



o o 



p:5 



OJ 



o S-5 



a 

03 

a 

pl3 

CJ 



QJ 

o 
G 

QJ 
> 



<Dp-1 > 0) 

pJG ^^ pP 

* p ^11I 

IZl T4 '-I 
cfl G QJ 

"^ 4-;^ > 

05 03 QJ 

.S bO QJ G 

rj QJ 03 

"53 03 a CJ 



>-. G p ^ 
■i+H QJ > 41 TG 

sp^^:§ 

o OJ ^ ;g 



0) 



•SS == 



CJ 

G 



o.S 



o 

QJ O 

::i QJ O o3 . 

G o c <1J <^ • 

Oi y G ^ QJ 

p:i a>T3 O ^ 05 



QJ 



G-n 



QJ 
Si 



QJ G _ .„ 

- +2 QJ 

G {H 5l 

QJ fli 03 



;i 

03 
QJ n, 
!i ^ 



-^ CJ >; _G 

CS 03 pP CJ Td 



CJ 
QJ 
P^ 

QJ 



T3 
G 
G 
O 

=41 
O 

Q^ ■ 

QJ 
—I o 



QJ (-1 
G -r; 

QJ ^ 

0T3 

> QJ 

OJ 1 — I 

p^ ^ 

a G 






io 



>■ a 
=*»J 



pS O r 



-d c: . 

■r-i-HCO 
> u^ 

Cf^ - 
'^ cdON 

I-. O " 

'*' ^■^ 



r5 2 i; Jt 



S a 



ly CO 

c a 



o 

u 



a 

CO 

Cll 

o 

j3 



j3 



Xi 

< 

c/i 

c 



J 



pS " 



■£ 
o 

c 
< ^ 

'^ I— I 

Scu 



03 ^-< 

a O 



O 
Ih 



o 

03 
■'T3 

^1 

W --2 

> QJ 

S G 

ti 

QJ 

> 

QJ 

PS 



_CJ cfl-S 



QJ a 

4_, H 



O 

03 

Si 

03 
o 



QJ 



QJ 



••1 O QJ 

^l^pS 
+-' O 4_l . 

- " S § 
•pH 4_, ^ > 

cd 



s^g^ 



.S bO o G 
"tJ 03 O CJ 



>^ G O ^- 
Q)^^'B" 

S . Cfl G rG 

6 fl >. ^ .a 



O QJ 

pJirQ 



QJ 

Si pG 



t-" "G :3 ■'-' 






QJ 
CJ 

G 

QJ 

G 



G ^ 

o 
G 



QJ O 

CJ 03 

G Si J ^-P.^ 

^ QJ '73 O *-*^ 03 

•Pi > hOiQ G " 

QJ ^Ji fl ""K 

QJ e ti L fl rt 

Pfl § § § 2^ " 



Si 
QJ 
„ >,. 

QJ 03 " ■ 
Si QJ 



a 



o 

QJ 
Pi 

C/3 

QJ 
Si 

T3 
G 
G 
O 

Ml 

o 
i1 ^ 
Pi" • 
QJ 

CO >■ 

•P4 O 






CO 



3 - 
3 t 

to 

(J *- 



^ 



G -^ 

QJ fe 
Si '^ 

QJ i-a 

> QJ 

QJ , — I 



OS 03 ^ O T3 



T3 c . 

•-HHCO 

5 '^ 

no 

u ^ 
O ■"" Sfn 

Of c a 



o 
U 

C 

a 

to 

S) 

o 
X 



< 

c/5 

b 

c 
o 



o 



pi u 



c 
O 
"> 



cS 


>i 


a 





ci3 


fa 


B 









ii 




fc 





T3 
QJ 

d 
O 
Cfl 
CO 

G 
03 

T3 
O 









CO >^ 

i^ a 



03 
Si 

03 

p£3 

a 



QJ 



QJ 
O 
C 
QJ 

Si 

<V 

Si 



Si 

O 

Ml 

QJ 
CJ 
C 
Q) 

Si 

QJ 
> 



t; S "^ 

•11 -rH O flj 

-^ hJpfl >^ 

O 3 tJD 

OJP^ ^ SJ 

-fl ? pP 

CO G QJ 

.S bJO QJ G 

r3 QJ 03 

"i! 03 CJ O 



>^ G ' 


41 
CJ 
QJ 

CO 
QJ 




r^ f^ 


home lif 
Idren. The 
rtesy show 
her and t 
which chi] 


1^. 

.=5 -J 


:s in 
n chi 
, ecu 
h ot 
;r, in 


UJ .PH fli «J 


: is p 
love.' 


^ ^ 


influenc 
verence 
guidanci 
s to ea 
md pray 
cipate." 


J:; 






■-■1— 100 


C -r-i 


nj ."f-j 


hree 
:en re 
entle ; 
arent 
ren, a 
parti 


evere 
led w 


from D 
61, 259, 


Hi^ W)^2 fl 


± bJD 

a 




^ ^ ^^^ 




03 03 pP Ti 


Q c a 



o 
U 

60 
C 

a 



o 

J3 



c/i 



o 



C 

■£ 
o 

.S o 

pS " 

< g 

.a^ 

a o 

a 

o 

Sh 

fa 



u 

p:; 
w 

P5 



QJ O 

OS -l-i 
to &o 

,:^ ''-< 
T3 QJ 

is CJ 

PT^ ^ 

^ 03 

O jG 

Ml 
!i QJ 

O 'G 

Ml ^ 

CJ 
OJ 

CJ QJ 

flrP 

QJ -^ 



CJ >^ 

^pS 

CO "IP 



03 



QJ, 

g ^ 

a 2 

QJ R 

^ g^ 

•p4 O OJ 

h-Jpfl >H 

•fH "*^ 

P-H ^ QJ 

fl p^Q 



CO 



Si 

QJ 
> 
OJ "5 

■ bJO 

G 



P5 



'^ G qj 

t;^ > 

rt QJ 

Si T3 

bO G 

QJ a 

oS O CJ 



O >sG O^ 

Sp^|*^:a 
a G >, =^ 

CO 

QJ 



O 
pfl 



G 
QJ 

!i 

T3 



QJ > 



.a pfl 



CO 

O 
G 
Q> 

G 

fl 



T:;pfl ^ 

== n fl 

o " -fl 

p,pfl ^ 
. . QJ- CJ 9^ 

QJ y 5? XT- 

QJ ra 

Bi QJ 



G 

C =2 
qjtJ 

Si -pj 4- 
QJ G 

> bC "3 

^pii fl 

r;3 QJ 

fl ^ 



pfl ?i QJ 



o ^-5 

03 -Pi . 
■M 

fl 03 

^ p^ 



^1 ^*^ 
ra Si 



fl 
QJ 

I B >^!ifl ^ 

03 03 pP O 'T3 



H -^ W) P^S G 



O 

Q) 

CO 

QJ 
)i 

T3 
G 
G 
O 

Mh 

O 

Ph" • 
^ QJ 
CO ^ 

•PH O 



3: - 

to 

^0. 



w^ 



^ Or 



1^ 
C --^ 

Q) ^ 
;i "^ 

gj^J 

p:; ^ 



'CI c ■ 

•->— 100 
> u-1 
CO .-r^ 

COOn 

■^^ o^ 

4_i tn 

O '"'' hi, 
^ cu CO 

Ct c a 



o 
O 

CiO 

C 
a 



o 
j3 



< 

c 
o 



O 



'^ l-H 

3 Si 

i 

Si 

fa 



T3 
QJ 
!i 

a 

03 



^1 

w ^ 

i> QJ 

^ fl 

Ph QJ 
Si 

Q) 

> 

QJ 



-M 1 >^ 

o o S^ 

CJ CO "il 

■r1 ^^ 

i^^ >^ QJ 

53 " 

g ^ 

a 0^ 



41 

o 

03 
;i 
03 
pl3 
a 



QJ 



OJ t: S 03 

•pH -n-l O QJ 

pJG j^ Sh 

o ^^ bC 

■-^ 4^ pJO > 

Cfl 03 . QJ 

S)^^"fl 

.b bJO QJ fl 

"43 03 O CJ 



QJ >^G O^ 
tj QJ > ■'-' ^ 
■^P^ S -fl 

a c i. "^ o 

o 0) ^^;g 
pflp^ii fe| 

-^ !i ^ '^ 

g^.a 
^.pfl ' 

QJ 
O 

G 
03 



•s:fl 



CO 

Q) 
CJ 
fl 
OJ 
G 

G 



QJ 
O 
G 



Si 

CJ QJ 



T3 & 



0) Ti 

Si -pH 

2^ fl ^t; 

c^ ^ fl =3 

S fl S ^ 04 

__ Jy 0) S t-i 
H ^ "^^ ^2 fl 

■^ CS TG S 

^ )l >^,JI| _iH 

03 03 pfl CJ T3 



QJ 
QJ 

pfl 



O 

QJ 

CO 

QJ 
Si 

13 

fl 
G 
O 

Ml 

O 

Si ^ 

Pi" ■ 

QJ 

CO > 

•-H O 



as 



5 £■ 
I0 

>• CO 

(J J-; 



^ O 



QJ ^ 
ii "^ 
QJ Xi 



13 c . 

'^•— I 00 

> m 

CO -c-j 

cnfQ r^ 
IK 

° "^ ii, 
1 10 00 

^ <U CO 

uc a 



o 
U 



a 

CO 

00 
o 



4S 



< 

CO 

D 
.S 

o 



o 
.a o 

^ 2 

a p^ 
a o 



o 
fa 




Begins 
at Home 



A Little-picture Story by Marie F. Felt 

If there were more reverence in human hearts, there 
would he . . . more increased capacity for joy and 
gladnessJ — President David O. McKay. 

If you could have visited at the home of David 
and Jennette Evans McKay in HuntsviUe, Utah, on 
a typical summer evening in 1897, you might have 
seen kneeling in a circle for family prayer eight Mc- 
Kay children and their parents. Family prayer was 
held every day, both night and morning, for the 
McKays were grateful for the Gospel and its bless- 
ings. The children, by name, were David O. and 
Jeanette, both of whom had graduated from the 
University of Utah earlier that year, Thomas E., 
Ann, William, Morgan, EHzabeth, and Katherine. 
(Two older girls, Margaret and EUena, had died the 
year David 0. was seven years old.) 

When prayer was finished, the family would rise 
and take their places at the supper table. Then 
Father McKay would ask one of the family to pro- 
nounce the blessing on the food. 

Church First 

There must have been much reminiscing on such 
evenings that summer. David 0., the eldest son, had 
just been asked to do missionary work in Great 
Britain. Even before graduation he had planned to 
begin teaching school that fall; but when the mission 
call came, there was no question as to what he should 
do. He immediately postponed his teaching career 
and prepared to leave for the British Isles. Why 
would he do this? 

Father McKay and their lovely mother always 
had put the Church and its teachings first. They 
had taught their children by word and example to 
love the Gospel, and to love and respect the author- 




(For Course 1, lessons of July 16 and 23, "We Talk to Heavenly- 
Father," "We Pray Alone," and "We Pray with Other People"; for 
Course la, lessons of July 2 and 30, "President David O. McKay" 
and "We Learn How To Live"; for Course 3, lessons of July 2 to 16. 
"We Are Commanded To Pray," "We Are Commanded To Be Rev- 
erent," and "We Keep the Sabbath Day"; for Course 9, lessons of 
June 25 and July 9, "A Leader Honors His Parents" and "A Leader 
Has Righteous Friends"; to support family home evening lesson 14; 
and of general interest.) 

"^Pathways to Happiness, compiled by Llewelyn R. McKay; Book- 
craft. Inc., Salt Lake City, Utah, 1957; page 260. 



Four-year-old David O. McKay, with his father. 

ities of the Church. They had taught them to show 
love for their Heavenly Father by being reverent in 
the home, in Sunday School, and in other meetings. 

The children had learned early that when the 
ward teachers (we call them home teachers now) 
came to call each month, the entire family was to 
gather in the parlor to hear the message brought by 
these good men. No matter what the members of 
the McKay family were doing, they came to listen 
and were attentive and respectful. No one excused 
himself for another appointment or to do school les- 
sons, or anything else. 

A Ten-year-old Grownup 

Mother McKay reminded the family how "grown- 
up" David O. had been, even when he was ten years 
old. His father had just returned from a mission 
to Scotland and that same year was ordained bishop 
of the ward in Eden, a tiny community about two 
and a half miles from HuntsviUe. Bishop McKay 
would make the trip each Sunday riding the family 
mule, and young David would go along to bring the 
mule back. The family attended meetings in Hunts- 
viUe. They never used a saddle, but in lieu of it 
threw an old quilt across the mule's wide back. 
After church, the bishop would walk back home. 



MAY 1 967 



193 



REVERENCE BEGINS AT HOME (Continued from preceding page.) 



One Sunday morning after David 0. had left his 
father and started home, the quilt slipped, and 
David slid off the mule. Free of the boy's weight, the 
mule moved on without his rider. David trudged 
after him, dragging the quilt. It could have been a 
long walk for the boy, but a kind man cornered the 
mule in his corral. He helped David replace the quilt 
and climb back on the animal for his ride home. 

Just two years later, Father McKay was named 
bishop of Huntsville Ward, and the family was proud 
to have the father worthy of this honor. Church 
was the number one activity in their lives, and each 
Sunday found them attending both Sunday School 
and sacrament meeting — all in the family, with- 
out exception. During the week all assignments 
and responsibilities in the Church were taken care 
of proudly. If home duties conflicted, they had to 
wait. Church was first, and all else second. 

Reverence Is Rewarding 

The McKay family was proud of the fact that 
during the 25 years Bishop McKay presided in 
Huntsville, the entire community showed love for 
their Heavenly Father by their reverent attitude in 
church. They knew they were in the house of the 
Lord and that visiting, loud talking, and much mov- 
ing around were out of order. With such behavior, 
the spirit of the Lord was abundant in their meet- 
ings; and everyone felt it was good to be there. It 



was interesting and eventful to belong to the McKay 
family, they all remembered, especially during the 
time that Father McKay was bishop. Since there 
were no hotels or cafes in Huntsville at that time, 
the visiting Church authorities at quarterly con- 
ferences were guests of the McKays. So, too, 
were those who represented the auxiliaries — the Sun- 
day School, Primary, Mutual, and Relief Society. 
The children were privileged to mingle with them, 
listen to their words of wisdom, and partake of the 
wonderful spirit they brought with them. Never 
were the children sent away so that the adults could 
talk alone. 

Reverence Begins at Home 

Perhaps it was this influence that led President 
David O. McKay to say in later years: 

"Reverence, as charity, begins at home. In early 
childhood children should be trained to be respect- 
ful, deferential, reverent — respectful to one another, 
to strangers and visitors — deferential to the aged 
and infirm — reverential to things sacred, to parents 
and parental love. . . . No true psychologist will say 
that a child should grow up without a consciousness 
that in the home and in the presence of others there 
are bounds and limitations to his activities, desires, 
and tantrums. Train up a child in the way he should 
go, and when he is old he will not depart from it.* 
(Concluded on page 196) 



Family of David McKay and Jennette Evans McKay in 1 897. Front row, left to right, David McKay, William, Katherine, 
Morgan, Elizabeth, Jennette Evans McKay. Second row, left to right, Jeanette, David O., Thomas E., and Ann. 




194 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



Junior Sunday School 




WHY AND 
WHY NOT? 



SHOULD ALL JUNIOR SUNDAY SCHOOL 

OFFICERS AND TEACHERS ATTEND 

PRAYER MEETING? 

"The prayer meeting should precede every Sun- 
day School session, and should be attended by all 
officers and teachers. A separate prayer meeting for 
the Junior Sunday School officers and teachers is 
not recommended. The prayer meeting commences 
at least twenty minutes before the Sunday School 
and convenes for at least ten minutes. It is a period 



of spiritual uplift and concerted supplication for 
divine help." (See The Sunday School Handbook 
1964, page 24.) 

The responsibility of leadership in bringing the 
Gospel to the children of the Church gives pause for 
humility and the recognized need for divine guid- 
ance. Individual and group prayer, plus thorough 
preparation, strengthen the Junior Sunday School 
officer or teacher for her task. Regular attendance 
at the prayer meeting conducted by the Simday 
School superintendent is a duty wisely assigned. 

Sometimes local conditions require that many 
children consistently arrive at Church while their 
leaders are in prayer meeting. In such cases it may 
be well to appoint a parent or some other respon- 
sible adult to supervise the children in the Junior 
Sunday School chapel until the officers and teachers 
conclude prayer meeting. This same adult could 
assist the children with wraps and help them ob- 
serve appropriate conduct during the pre-Sunday 
School period; she could then return to the Senior 
Sunday School. 

Junior Sunday School Committee. 



SIX PRINCIPLES 



A well-known American merchant prince and 
philanthropist, J. C. Penney, has formulated six prin- 
ciples for practical application to daily life and busi- 
ness transactions. These principles, as published in 
The Pick-Up, are as follows: 

I believe in preparation. A man must know every- 
thing possible about his business; he must know 
more than any other man knows. His achievement 
depends largely on preparation. 

/ believe in hard work. The only kind of luck any 
man is justified in counting on is hard work; this 
means sacrifice, persistent effort, and dogged deter- 
mination. Growth is never by chance; it is the re- 
sult of a combination of forces. 

/ believe in honesty. There is a kind of honesty 
that keeps a man from taking something which be- 
longs to someone else, but there is also that finer 
honesty that will not allow a man to give less than 
his best, that makes him count not his hours but 
his duties and opportunities, that constantly urges 



him to enlarge his information and to increase his 
efficiency. 

/ believe in having confidence in men. I have 
found my most valuable associates by giving men 
responsibility, by making them feel that I relied 
upon them. And those who have proved unworthy 
have only caused the others, who far outnumbered 
them, to stand in a clearer light. 

/ believe in appealing to the spirit of men. One 
of the wisest men who ever lived said: "For the 
letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life." Every enter- 
prise in which I have been interested demonstrates 
this fact. 

I believe in a practical application of the Golden 
Rule as taught by the Master nearly two thousand 
years ago — one of the most fundamental laws that 
can be expressed in words, specifically stated in the 
literature of eleven known religions.^ 



^Taken from Swnshine Magazine, May, 1960, page 6A. 
Library File Reference: LIVING. 



MAY 1967 



195 




THE SUPERINTENDENT AND 
THE JUNIOR SUNDAY SCHOOL 



Under the new, recommended 
uniform plan for the division of 
responsibility of the superintend- 
ency, the superintendent has direct 
supervision of Junior Sunday 
School, in addition to other duties. 
This assignment has given many 
superintendents a new respect for 
the accomplishments and problems 
of the Junior Sunday School co- 
ordinator. 

One superintendent recently at- 
tended a Junior Sunday School 
class of 27 active, noisy, five-year- 
olds. Two classes had been com- 
bined when a teacher failed to ap- 
pear. Individually, or in small 
groups, these children, willing to 
cooperate and anxious to learn, 
would have contributed to ideal 
teaching situations. Together they 
made presentation of the lesson 
impossible. 

After 45 minutes in this uncom- 
fortable class, the superintendent 
made several resolutions: 



1. His regard for coordinators 
and Junior Sunday School teach- 
ers would be even higher than it 
had been. 

2. He would personally work on 
the problem of teacher absenteeism 
but would recognize that some 
absenteesim is properly excused. 

3. A reserve of teachers would 
be ready to prevent a recurrence 
of this awkward class situation. 

4. Where there were too few 
classrooms available, several small 
groups separated in the cultural 
hall would be better off than a 
large group of children in a small 
classroom. 

5. He would work with the bish- 
op toward improving physical sur- 
roundings so that they could be 
adapted to the teaching of small 
children: low tables, chairs low 
enough to permit little feet to 
touch the floor, paper and crayons, 
picture books. (All of these are 
now considered necessary aids. 



Though this was not a wealthy 
ward, the superintendent was sure 
that these helps could be made 
available to his teachers. 

The Sunday School Handbook 
1964 recommends that there be no 
more than 12 to 15 children in any 
class in Courses 2 and 3. If the 
children can be subdivided into 
even smaller groups, a better 
teaching situation is created. 

The Savior said, "Suffer Httle 
children to come unto me." We 
superintendents can help them 
reach the Savior by making pos- 
sible that intimacy which comes 
between a loving, prepared teach- 
er and the members of her class 
when the class is the right size. 

Two of the superintendent's 
first duties in Junior Sunday 
School are to appraise the size of 
his classes and the availability of 
teachers and classrooms. 
— Superintendent 
David Lawrence McKay. 



REVERENCE BEGINS AT HOME (Concluded from page 194.) 

[Proverbs 22:6] is an admonition full of sound 
philosophy."- 

About a month before David O. turned 14, Pa- 
triarch John Smith came and stayed at their home 
several weeks, giving patriarchal blessings to the 
people of Huntsville and the nearby communities. 
Young David 0. received his blessing at that time. 
After the blessing was finished, the patriarch said 
to the youth, "You have something to do besides 
play marbles." 

Instead of being impressed with the wonderful 
blessing he had received, David went immediately to 
his mother and told her what had happened. Indig- 
nantly he said, 'Tf Brother Smith thinks that I am 
going to stop playing marbles, he is mistaken. I am 
not." With love and understanding Sister McKay 
explained to young David that he had misunder- 



stood Brother Smith; he didn't have to stop playing 
marbles right then, but if he loved the Lord, obeyed 
his parents, and lived the principles of the Gospel, 
there would be a day when he would be a teacher 
and a leader of his Heavenly Father's children. 

There were many other experiences the McKay 
children and their parents would remember those 
summer nights in 1897. And their hearts were warm 
and grateful. David 0. knew as he prepared to leave 
on his mission that he had been trained up "in the 
way he should go." As he thought of all the things 
his parents had taught him, he knew he could teach 
and share these things with others all his life. 

How To Use the Pictures: 

In this issue of The Instructor are small pictures of 
"President David O. McKay" for distribution to the chil- 
dren. 

On the reverse side are appropriate statements on rever- 
ence by President McKay for their guidance. 



^Pathways to Happiness, pages 258-259. 



Library File Reference: McKAY, DAVID O. 



196 



THE IN STRUCTOR 



Answers to Your Questions. 



Right Way to End a 2V2-mmute Talk 

Q. Is there a wrong and a right 
way to end a 2^/^ -minute talk? 

— Tulsa Stake. 

A. Yes. Sunday School teachers 
should teach those who give 2^- 
mhiute talks to understand and 
believe what they say. If the stu- 
dent is going to speak of a prin- 
ciple, he should be asked if he be- 
lieves it to be true. If he does, he 
should bear testimony of its truth- 
fulness. This is done by saying: "I 
bear you my testimony that this is 
true in the name of Jesus Christ. 
Amen." 

If the speaker wishes that which 
he says to be applicable and in- 
fluential in the lives of the Usten- 
ers, he should pray that it wiU 



have this effect. Such a conclusion 
could be: "That we may all do this 
is my prayer in the name of Jesus 
Christ. Amen." Or, "I pray that 
we may all apply these principles, 
and I do it in the name of Jesus 
Christ. Amen." 

Often a speaker will tell an ordi- 
nary story in which he thinks he 
finds a moral. The story may be 
about baseball or an experience in 
the canyon or any kind of com- 
monplace incident. It is not proper 
to conclude such a story suddenly 
with, "I say this in the name of 
Jesus Christ. Amen." This expres- 
sion is inaccurate and too common- 
place. 

The story, if it has a moral, can 
be concluded with: "I pray that 



we may all be as faithful as the 
boy in this story, and I do this in 
the name of Jesus Christ. Amen." 
It is to be hoped that every 2^^- 
minute talk will be worthy to be 
concluded with a prayer or a bless- 
ing or a testimony "in the name 
of Jesus Christ. Amen." 

— General Superintendency. 



COMING EVENTS 

May 14, 1967 
Mother's Day 



July 24, 1967 
Mormon Pioneer Day 



Memorized Recitations. 



For July 2, 1967 

Scriptures listed here should be 
recited in unison by students of 
Courses 11 and 19 during the wor- 
ship service of July 2, 1967. 
These scriptures should be memo- 
rized by students of the respective 
classes during the months of May 
and June. 

Course 11: 

(This scripture tells us that 
there was a written record for the 
Israelite tribe of Judah [the Holy 
Bible] and also a written record 
for the Israelite tribe of Joseph 



[the Book of Mormon], and that 
the two records would be brought 
together as one.) 

"The word of the Lord came 
again unto me, saying, 

"Moreover, thou son of man, 
take thee one stick, and write up- 
on it, For Judah, and for the chil- 
dren of Israel his companions: 
then take another stick, and write 
upon it. For Joseph, the stick of 
Ephraim, and for all the house of 
Israel his companions: 

"And join them one to another 
into one stick; and they shall be- 
come one in thine hand." 

—Ezekiel 37:15-17. 



Course 19: 

(This scripture foretells the ap- 
pearance of Elijah in the last days 
to restore the keys of sealing to 
the earth.) 

"Behold, I will send you Elijah 
the prophet before the coming of 
the great and dreadful day of the 
Lord: 

"And he shall turn the heart of 
the fathers to the children, and 
the heart of the children to their 
fathers, lest I come and smite the 
earth with a curse." 

— Malachi 4:5, 6. 



The Deseret Sunday School Union. 



Advisers to the General Board: Richabd L. Evans, Howard W. Huntek 

General Superintendent: David Lawrence McKay 
Lynn S. Richards, First Assistant General Superintendent; Royden G. Dekrick, Second Assistant General Superintendent; 

Richabd E. Folland, General Secretary 



David L. McKay 
Lynn S. Richards 
Royden G. Derrick 
Richard E. Folland 
Claribel W. Aldous 
Ruel A. AUred 
J. Hugh Baird 
Catherine Bowles 



MEMBERS OF THE DESERET SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION BOARD 



John S. Hoyden 
Marshall T. Burton 
Herald L. Carlston 
Victor B. Cline 
Calvin C. Cook 
Robert M. Cundick 
Reed C. Durham, Jr. 



Robert L. Egbert 
Henry Eyring 
William F. Gay 
Elmer J. Hartvigsen 
Sam.uel L. Holmes 
Laurence A. Lyon 
Thomas J. Parmley 



Dean A. Peterson 
Willis S. Peterson 
Blaine R. Porter 
Warren E. Pugh 
Ethna R. Reid 
Wayne F. Richards 
G. Robert Ruff 



Alexander Schreiner 
Joseph Fielding Smith, Jr. 
Donna D. Sorensen 
Lorin F. Wheelwright 
Frank S. Wise 
Clarence E. Wonnacott 
Ralph Woodward 



MAY 1967 



197 



IT has been a humbling experience to live and work 
among the Indians of Arizona and New Mexico 
for the past two years. As a missionary, I was con- 
tinually brought face to face with their childlike 
faith, their sincerity, and their humility. I believe 
we can learn a great deal about living from their 
simple way of life. 

The Indians are a people whom the Lord has 
humbled in two ways: by environment and by sub- 
jection to the white man. But in these harsh pro- 
cesses the Indians have found the power of humility 
and simple faith. Their minds have not been tar- 
nished by the sophistication of the world. In my 
thinking, these are people who have not lived by 
bread alone. 



Many times in the desert I have watched them 
pray for rain to save their parched and dying crops 
— and the rain fell. They have learned the practi- 
cality of applying spiritual principles to everyday life. 

It is my conviction that these covenant people 
of Israel possess many outstanding qualities of great- 
ness, but they lack one important thing: The In- 
dian people, as a whole, do not have a true under- 
standing of the nature of our Heavenly Father nor 
a testimony of Jesus Christ. As they gain in under- 
standing and testimony, they will claim their right- 
ful position of inheritance and honor and leadership 
in God's kingdom, in accordance with the promise 
of the scriptures: 



As missionaries extend their labors over the earth today, the words 
of the Savior to the sons of Mosiah echo down to us — 

"GO FORTH 

AMONG THE LAMANITES 

THY BRETHREN 

by D. Corydon Hammond* 




198 



Art by Dale Kilbourn. 

THE I N STR U CTOR 



And this is life eternal^ that they might know 
thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom 
thou hast sent. (John 17:3.) 

As this remnant of Israel gains doctrinal knowl- 
edge they will become as the converts of the sons 
of Mosiah who were "... numbered among the peo- 
ple who were of the church of God. And they were 
also distinguished for their zeal towards God, and 
also towards men; . . . and they were firm in the 
faith of Christ, even unto the end." (Alma 27:27.) 

With this knowledge, and the spiritual qualities 
they already possess, Indian Israel truly will have 
blossomed as a rose. Some of them already are 
gaining these blessings. 

In Acoma Pueblo, New Mexico, my companion 
and I taught a family who are members of a tribe 
that generally had been quite reluctant to listen to 
missionaries. Less than a year ago we went into 
the home of an elderly couple there and presented 
the plan of life and an introduction to the Book of 
Mormon. The woman translated to her husband, who 
spoke little English. He was a stately man, yet meek 
and humble and sincere. As we concluded, we asked 
if there were any questions. He spoke to his wife in 
Indian for a long time; then she turned to us and 
said: 

"He has no questions. The story you bring to us 
is true. Years ago his grandfather told him many 
of these things." 

And the Lord, prophesying of these things and 
this people, said: 

And thou shalt be brought down, and shalt 
speak out of the ground, and thy speech shall be 
low out of the dust, and thy voice shall be, as of one 
that hath a familiar spirit. . . . (Isaiah 29:4.) 

The Gospel of Jesus Christ does have a "fami- 
liar spirit" to modern Indian Israel, just as it had 
more than two thousand years ago when the sons 
of Mosiah gave up a throne, and in spite of the 
laughter and scorn of their associates, went forth in 
fasting and prayer, teaching among the Lamanites 
for many years. Later, Jesus Christ Himself pre- 
sented His message to their descendants, the ances- 
tors of the Indians of today. 

In our day Elder Spencer W. Kimball has been 
inspired to declare that "the day of the Lamanite 



(For Course 7, lesson of June 18, "Indians, Friend and Foe"; for 
Course 9, lesson of May 28, "A Leader Serves"; for Course 11, les- 
son of May 28, "Present Missionary System"; Course 13, lesson of 
May 28, "How the Gospel Spreads"; for Course 15, lesson of July 9, 
"Mission to the Lamanites"; for Course 29, lesson of July 2, "True 
Church, A Missionary Church"; to support family home evening 
lesson 18; and of general interest.) 

*D. Cory don Hammond served in the Southwest Indian Mission 
from 1964 to 1966. He is attending the University of Utah preparing 
to go into Indian education. He is employed by the Western History 
Center at U. of U. doing historical research and field work among 
western Indian tribes. Brother Hammond is a son of Lee J. and 
Cleo Haslam Hammond; the family live in Monument Park First 
Ward, Monument Park (Utah) Stake, 



is here." And from the comers of the globe and 
the isles of the sea, the Lord is calling and gather- 
ing faithful servants to go among this remnant of 
Israel again. And He is saying to us, even as He 
said to the Nephites: 

. . . Go forth among the Lamanites, thy brethren, 
and establish my word; yet ye shall be patient in 
long-suffering and afflictions, that ye may show forth 
good examples unto them in me, and I will make an 
instrument of thee in my hands unto the salvation of 
many souls. (Alma 17:11.) 

About a year and a half ago more than 180 mis- 
sionaries in the Southwest Indian Mission himibled 
themselves and united in prayer and fasting to show 
the Lord that "they meant business." To show their 
sincerity these servants fasted for three days and pe- 
titioned the Lord concerning the welfare of the In- 
dian people. Then the missionaries put forth in- 
creased effort to teach the Gospel. These are the 
kind of servants the Lord is sending forth to gather 
Israel. 

The greatest privilege of my life has been to 
serve the Master among Indian Israel. To me, there 
is no greater opportunity than to serve among these 
humble people. Once an individual has lived and 
served among them, his life is forever changed. 

Concerning the descendants of the Book of Mor- 
mon peoples, Elder Matthew Cowley said: 

. . . After this conference I am going among the 
Indian people of the Southwest Indian Mission. 
Brothers and sisters, they are our people. The salva- 
tion of these people rests upon us. The rewards to 
which they are entitled must come through us and 
the service we are willing to render to them and 
for them. 

I love these native races. They have given me 
something that I could have received from no other 
source. Even though some classify them as heathen, 
yet I have never seen the veil between God and man 
so thin as I have seen among these natives races. . . . 

I offer up my thanksgiving to my Father in heav- 
en for these natives who are here today. My, how 
much I owe to them. . . .^ 

Think of it — a high priest, an apostle of the 
Lord, expressing his debt to these people! Surely 
every servant who has labored among Indian Israel 
feels this way. 

I know that another latter-day prophet was 
speaking for God when he said of the missionary 
work among these people: 

This work is of the greatest importance of any 
work of the present day.^ 

'Matthew Cowley, Matthew Cowley Speaks; Deseret Book Com- 
pany, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1954; pages 24-25, 28. 

-Orson Pratt (July 15, 1855), Journal of Discourses, Vol. 9, page 
178. 

Library Pile Reference : INDIANS— MISSIONS. 



MAY 1967 



199 



OUR WORSHIPFUL 
HYMN PRACTICE 

Senior Sunday School Hymn for the Month of July 




Hymn: "Lead Me Into Life Eter- 
nal"; author, John A. Widtsoe; com- 
poser, Alexander Schreiner; Hymns — 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints, No. 141. 

To the Chorister: 

There is no greater striving in 
the human soul than that for eter- 
nal life. But eternal life, as the 
Gospel teaches it, is more than 
mere existence forever; it means 
much more than playing harps in 
the heavens and leading an other- 
wise idle life. Life eternal, to Lat- 
ter-day Saints, means a life of in- 
terested, purposeful, and important 
activity — progress and achieve- 
ment without end. That is what 
we are singing about in this hymn. 
The message of the hymn was 
written by the late Elder John A. 
Widtsoe, of the Council of the 
Twelve; the music, by Alexander 
Schreiner, Tabernacle organist. 

This hymn has an earlier ver- 
sion. Dr. Widtsoe first wrote it as 
"Father, Lead Me Out of Dark- 
ness," with the intention that the 
hymn should be sung by investiga- 
tors of the Gospel. But he found 
that by the time investigators were 
far enough advanced to learn such 
a hymn, they were really ready for 
baptism. Then they would rather 
sing: "Lead Me Into Life Eternal." 
Thus the hymn was revised for 
our present hymnbook. 

The hymn is easy to sing. It has 
an easy register (that is, there are 
neither very high nor low notes) 
and an easy rhythm. Encourage 
the people to sing it with full voice. 
Let the tempo be moderate so that 
it will call no attention to itself. 

Some people sing with their 



hymnbooks in their laps, and when 
the chorister looks at them they 
appear as if they were asleep. En- 
courage singers to raise their books 
sufficiently so that they may be 
able to read the words and see the 
chorister in about the same line 
of sight. 'J'his procedure will like- 
wise help them to sing with an 
upward look. Let us really appear 
to be singing with gladness and 
worship directly to our God. Let 
us sing to Him in gladness and in 
appreciation for the richness of 
blessings showered upon us. Let 
us hold our heads high for spiri- 
tual refreshment when we sing to 
the Lord. If people are lax, then 
the chorister should in all kind- 
ness and gentleness, and without 
reproof, persuade them to sing 
upward. Professional singers al- 
ways endeavor to take some kind 
of a heroic stance when they sing. 
Our stance and attitude can be 
more than heroic; it can be divine- 
ly worshipful. 

To the Organist: 

Use a fairly strong organ, with 
a bright, not dull, tone color. This 
will help inspire the people to sing 
with full heart and voice. Let the 
organ and voices ring out together 
to the words: "Father, all my 
heart I give thee" and "Grant me 
ready strength for all." You will 
notice that the whole hymn points 
to the idea of strength rather than 
weakness. 

Now, how do you produce a 
bright tone color with the organ 
stops at your disposition? You will 
do well to discuss this important 
part of your artistic work with 



other organists. The dullest tone 
color is always eight-foot tone 
alone. This single color may be 
built up gradually in brightness by 
adding to it the stops with pitches 
of one or two octaves higher. The 
octave coupler similarly will help. 
Let us encourage you to try out 
these technical details when you 
are alone in church practicing the 
organ. Observe also that a 16-foot 
tone (available on most organs) 
produces a strong, dull, tone qual- 
ity. Avoid it for congregational 
use, unless you are willing to play 
an octave higher with the hands. 

Your organ sound should be 
bold enough that people can hear 
it clearly and thus be inspired to 
sing with vigor. Any timid action 
on your part will weaken the sing- 
ing. Let your organ playing be an 
energetic example to the people. 
Let both organ and voice sound 
equally loud together, both wor- 
shiping the Lord with joy and 
thanksgiving. 

— Alexander Schreiner. 



July Sacrament Gems 

Senior Sunday School 

"... Thou shalt go to the house 
of prayer and offer up thy sacra- 
ments upon my holy day."^ 

^Doctrine and Covenants 59:9. 

Junior Sunday School 

"We partake of bread and water 
to witness that we remember Jesus 
Christ."^ 

^Journal of Discourses, Volume 11, page 40. 



200 



THE I NSTRUCTOR 



Junior Sunday School Hymn for the Month of July 



Hymn: "An Angel Came to Joseph 
Smith"; author, Anna Johnson; com- 
poser, Alexander Schreiner. 



Our hymn for the month of July 
is related to the early history of 
the Church. For many children 
this will be an introduction to the 
story of the Angel Moroni and 
his visits to the Prophet Joseph 
Smith. 

To the Chorister: 

Inasmuch as pictures are a good 
substitute for reality, you may 
wish to plan your presentation 
around the "Joseph and the Angel 
Moroni" flannel cutouts for The 
Children Sing; set 1 — M-c-2, M-c- 
3, and M-c-4. 

Occasional use of visual aids, 
carefully selected and skilfully pre- 
sented, will help to make your 
hymn-of-the-month presentation 
more meaningful to the boys and 
girls. Such aids lend variety to 
your teaching. They may also stim- 
ulate interest and make the chil- 
dren eager to sing. 

As you introduce the story of 
the Angel Moroni's visits to the 
Prophet Joseph, be sure this im- 
portant part of Church history is 
related accurately to the boys and 



girls. The hymn refers to the 
Book of Mormon. Read in the very 
front of the book the part entitled, 
"Origin of the Book of Mormon." 
Reread it! After studying this ma- 
terial you will be better prepared 
to teach the hymn with conviction 
and sincerity. 

Express the Gospel concept you 
wish to teach in words appropriate 
for little children. (Example: An 
angel guided the Prophet Joseph 
to the Hill Cumorah where he 
found a sacred book.) Outline your 
story and reduce it to a minimum 
of words, placing the pictures on 
the flannelboard as you tell the 
story of the angel's visit. Because 
of children's association with the 
words "plates" and "record" you 
will need to exercise caution in 
your explanation of these terms. 

Sing the first stanza to the chil- 
dren two or three times and then 
ask them to join with you. This is 
the whole-song method. You will 
need to work on some problem 
spots and repeat some phrases. If 
your Junior Sunday School is es- 
pecially young, teach by the phrase 
method. (See A Guide for Choris- 
ters and Organists in Junior Sun- 
day School, page 23.) Don't und- 
erestimate the need for repetition 



Organ Music To Accompany July Sacrament Gems 



^ 



Simplice 



^ 



m 



'J^ 



3x: 



rrr 



r 



f 



^ 



Darwin K. Wolf ore 



s 



^ 



TTT 



311 



J i 



r 



zz: 




ii J 

m m . ■* 



1^ 




and careful review of both words 
and melody. Isn't it better for 
children to sing the first stanza 
accurately than to mumble an oc- 
casional word in two or three 
stanzas? 

You will help the little ones re- 
member the Gospel concept if you 
have them pronounce the difficult 
words, such as: angel, Moroni, 
Prophet Joseph Smith, sacred, and 
precious. Yes, you are a teacher, 
an important Gospel teacher. 

Review 

Refer to The Instructor, No- 
vember, 1966, page 441, or Re- 
prints of Songs from The Instruc- 
tor, and review the number 
"Hosanna." Have the children sing 
this as a hymn of praise. Strive for 
quality and enthusiasm, rather 
than volume. (Refer to A Guide, 
page 14.) In your pronunciation 
of the key word "hosanna," avoid 
singing a nasal sound — "sanna"; 
instead, darken the "a" and sing 
"sa(h)nna." This will sound more 
musical, and the children will imi- 
tate with ease. For other reviews 
see the list of 1967 Hymns of the 
Month in The Instructor, Janu- 
ary, 1967, page 34. 

To the Organist: 

A suggestion for your prelude is 
"German Song," The Children 
Sing, No. 204. This is a beautiful, 
singing melody that needs to be 
played with a caressing touch in a 
quiet, legato style. The lefthand 
accompaniment is subdued and 
connected. The careful phrasing 
will help in your interpretation of 
the music. If your prelude doesn't 
have a calming effect on the con- 
gregation, evaluate your perfoi*m- 
ance critically. 

— Vernon J. LeeMaster. 



MAY 1 967 



201 



"7/ you hod lost the home where you were born, the old family home- 
stead that was very dear to you . . . would you not feel very much 
distressed and sad when finally it was discovered that you could not 
redeem it and the mortgage was to be foreclosed? . . . Supposing in such 
a moment a friend of yours could settle with the holder of the mortgage." 
Through the atonement of Christ we may say: 



A Friend Redeeras Our Home 



( EXCERPTED FROM A SERMON BY THE LATE ELDER MELVIN J. BALLARD, 

OF THE COUNCIL OF THE TWELVE*) 



. . . After the fall of Adam 
wherein mortality was intro- 
duced in the world, there was 
no way nor means by which 
man could be raised from the 
grave except through the death 
of the Divine One. A great and 
eternal law had been violated, 
and it required the death of a 
God, really, to atone for the 
broken law and to bring to pass 
the salvation of man and the 
salvation of the world. We do 
not accept in any theoretical 
way, but in a practical, in a 
real way, that the mission of 
the Lord Jesus Christ was to 
die for the sins of the world, 
to die to redeem all mankind 
from the grave, and to redeem man from his individ- 
ual sins upon certain terms and conditions that are 
specifically laid down in the Gospel. . . . 

. . . When man came into the world, he came 
under the bondage of death, for it was upon him. 
The seeds of death were in the body, and the mort- 
gage was to be foreclosed. Death was to have its 
own, and no power could stop man from passing 
through that thing we call death. It had to have its 
way, and so it claims us all. And yet the Lord Jesus 
Christ was the first one to rise from the dead. 

We know that He arose from the dead, not only 
because of the witnesses and the testimonies of the 




(For Course 9, lesson of May 28, "A Leader Serves"; for Course 
19, lesson of July 23, "The Resurrection"; for Course 27, lesson of 
May 28, "Obedience"; for Course 29, lessons of July 9 to 23, "A 
Voice of Warning," "His Many Mansions," and "Road to Salvation 
and Exaltation"; to support family home evening lesson 18; and of 
general interest.) 



apostles who saw Him and 
heard Him, but also . . . be- 
cause of the witnesses we have 
in our own day and time; and 
not only He, but others also 
arose. And we know that His 
rising from the dead was not a 
reawakening back to mortal 
life, as some are teaching who 
say that when His body lay in 
the chill tomb convulsions of 
nature occurred, maybe an 
earthquake, and that it awak- 
ened Him so that He came 
back to mortal life, then passed 
a few years with His disciples, 
and finally went off to die a 
a natural death. Such are the 
teachings of some today. We 
know they are not true, but that He really died, that 
His spirit went out of His body, and that His body 
was resurrected to a real and tangible condition. We 
know that not merely the spirit arose from the body, 
as some teach resurrection, but that His resurrec- 
tion was an actual coming back into a real and tan- 
gible body, so that He could say to His disciples, 
"Handle me and see; for a spirit hath not flesh and 
bones, as ye see me have." {Luke 24:39.) And so 
He was a real individual. 

As He was the first fruits of them that slept, so 
is He the Hght and the way. No man will ever come 
up except by the powers that Jesus Christ had, and 
He had them before He came into the world, and 
He exercised them Himself, and He will exercise 

*Melvin J. Ballard — CriLsader for Righteousness; Bookcraft, Salt 
Lake City, Utah, 1966; pages 144-149. 



202 



THE I NSTRUCTOR 



them for all mankind. They shall arise and come 
forth. 

I like to look upon it from a practical point of 
view, or in a way that we may clearly understand 
it, and I have sometimes used this illustration. If 
you had lost the home where you were bom, the 
old family homestead that was very dear to you, 
because in a foolish moment you overreached your- 
self and in excessive confidence you placed a mort- 
gage on that home, with the thought that you could 
easily redeem it, would you not feel very much 
distressed and sad when finally it was discovered 
that you could not redeem it and the mortgage was 
to be foreclosed so that it was to pass out of your 
hands? Supposing in such a moment a friend of yours 
could settle with the holder of that mortgage, and 
he would say to the holder of the mortgage, "You 
do not want this property." He would say, "No, I 
want my money." "Very well, I can give you the 
money. I will pay you. You surrender the mortgage 
to me." And when that friend had paid the price 
and had secured the title to the homestead, would 
he not be a wonderful friend if he should return 
and say to you, "Now I know this was your home, 
and I know you love it. I know you are very sorry 
to lose it. I have redeemed it. It is mine, but I 
propose to give it back to you on certain condi- 
tions. They are easy. It is possible for you to ful- 
fill them. I will not only give it back to you as it 
was, but I will glorify it also. I will make it more 
splendid and more wonderful than ever, and I will 
give it to you forever and ever." 

Would he not be a wonderful friend? That is 
the kind of friend that the world has in Jesus 
Christ, The mortgage of death was foreclosed, and 
death claimed its own. The grave received the body, 
and there it would stay forever and forever, were it 
not that Jesus Christ had interceded. He has settled 
with the holder of the mortgage. The price He paid 
was His life. In some way not yet perhaps fully 
comprehended and understood by us, He attained 
in that sacrifice a value of worth recognized, bar- 
tered for and exchanged and given to the holder of 
the mortgage; and He satisfied the claims upon these 
earth bodies. He has purchased us; He has re- 
deemed us; He has bought us; and we belong to 
Him. And now He proposes to give back these bod- 
ies glorified. To those who keep the full law He 
promises to give a celestial body, full of celestial 
power and glory and splendor; and to those who 
keep the terrestrial law, a body not so glorious, but 
still glorious and splendid; and telestial bodies to 
those who keep the telestial law; thus He extends 
to each this privilege. This is what the Lord Jesus 
Christ has done for man. ... 



And so He died upon the earth that He created 
under the appointment of His Father, to redeem the 
earth as well as men, and He died to earn the right 
to rule as King of kings and as Lord of lords. . . . 
Not only do we glorify that which He has accom- 
plished in life, but to us there is no ceremony, no 
ordinance, sacred or valid, that does not have the 
sealing power and blessing and sacred name of Jesus 
Christ associated with it, for all we are and all we 
do is in His sacred and holy name. 

We look to Him to return again. I rejoice to 
know that, glorious as the past has been, the future 
is more wonderful. To the men who stood by when 
He ascended, the angel said: 

. . . Ye men of Galilee, why stand ye gazing up 
into heaven? this same Jesus, which is taken up 
from you into heaven, shall so come in like mxinner 
as ye have seen him go into heaven. (Acts 1:11.) 

Indeed in part so has He come, for only a few, 
not the multitude, saw Him ascend, and a few have 
seen Him return. In the Sacred Grove, Joseph 
Smith saw Him . , . and upon other occasions a 
few have seen Him already come. So in part at 
least that return has been fulfilled. The Latter- 
day Saints have a different conception from others 
with reference to His return. It is not a return for 
all the world to know. No, the few should see Him 
return. In part that also was fulfilled when Joseph 
Smith and Oliver Cowdery in the Kirtland Temple 
saw a wonderful vision of Him. [There are] . . . four 
verses of the Book of Doctrine and Covenants, as 
their witniess concerning His appearance in that 
sacred place: 

The veil was taken from our minds, and the eyes 
of our understanding were opened. 

We saw the Lord standing upon the breastwork 
of the pulpit, before us; and under his feet was a 
paved work of pure gold, in color like amber. 

His eyes were as a flame of fire; the hair of his 
head was white like the pure snow; his countenance 
shone above the brightness of the sun; and his voice 
was as the sound of the rushing of great waters, 
even the voice of Jehovah, saying: 

I am the first and the last; I am he who liveth, 
I am he who was slain; I am your advocate with 
the Father. (Doctrine and Covenants 110:1-4.) 

. . . The day will come when He shall appear and 
the east and the west shall know it, and many shall 
call for the rocks to fall down upon them to hide 
them from His presence. He shall come to rule and 
reign as King of kings and Lord of lords, and we 
are preparing for that coming. That is the mission 
of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 
in the world today, to prepare the people to receive 
their King when He shall come. 

Library File Reference: EKSURRECTION. 



MAY 1967 



203 




...EVEN BY 
STUDY" 




by D. Chris Poulos' 



Art by Dale Kilbourn. 



Teacher Development Lesson for July 

A noted British psychologist once said that in 
the civihzed world most people continue some kind 
of study as long as they live. I believe this is gen- 
erally true. On the other hand, it is evident that few 
of us make little, if any, effort to engage in formal, 
sustained study relative to any particular field — 
including that of religion. 

It is encouraging to know that some people de- 
cide to work at learning. A housewife in Phoenix 
reared all her children and then went back to college 
to get a teaching certificate. A California high school 
girl worked extra hard to get straight A's, even 
though she was already getting A's and B's. A sales- 
man in Oregon enrolled in college to better his voca- 
tional position. A father in California sat on the 
back row of his daughter's seminary class to learn 
the Gospel. A steel worker in Utah said, "Even 
though I am 45 years old, I'm convinced that I can 
still learn well enough to get what I've always want- 
ed — a college degree. I don't care how long it takes, 
I will get a degree; and I am going to enroll this 
fall." For various reasons all these people were mo- 
tivated to continue their education, and the degree 
of success they attain will be directly related to the 
effectiveness of their study habits. 

What Is Study? 

What is there about study that differentiates it 
from other activities? The dictionary definition of 
study includes the following statements: 

1. The act of using the mind to acquire knowledge. 

2. To investigate closely. 3. To think upon closely. 
4. To be intelligently zealous. 5. Act of acquiring 
knowledge by one's own efforts. 

It seems to me that the major difference between 
studying and other activities (reading, for example) 
is in the degree of sustained effort. John A. Widtsoe 



describes this need for intense effort in continued 
learning, in religion as well as in secular fields: 

. . . To understand religious truth it must be 
studied. The Gospel of Jesus Christ comprehends 
all other knowledge. It is the philosophy that ex- 
plains the whole of man's relationship to the uni- 
verse. It invites the deepest study and the severest 
scrutiny. In religion as in science the more a sub- 
ject is studied, the more perfect is our knowledge 
of it. . . . 

Failure to become acquainted with a subject 
through careful study has led to many a disaster, 
especially in the spiritual field. Men who have spent 
years of study to perfect themselves in a science, 
and only weeks in the systematic consideration of 
religion, often set themselves up with splendid in- 
difference to consistency as equally competent in 
both fields. Religion demands studious attention if 
it is to be understood. It is well to ask the blatant 
unbeliever something about the serious study he has 
given the subject. 

. . . In the progress towards truth every traveler 
must walk upon his own feet. Study of the prin- 
ciples of truth is therefore required of alU 

By way of brief summary: 

1. Study involves sustained effort — hard work. 

2. A study of anything is always, to some extent, 
self-directed. 

Why Study? 

There are many reasons why one ought to want 
to study. These include "learning for learning's 
sake," increased economic security, the desire to ob- 
tain eternal life, to became a better teacher, etc. 

The Prophet Joseph Smith received two revela- 
tions emphasizing the importance of study: 

And as all have not faith, seek ye diligently and 

iJohn A. Widtsoe, In Search of Truth; Deseret Book Company, 
Salt Lake City, Utah, 1930; pages 116, 117. 

*D. Chris Poulos is chairman of the Department of Education 
Week Programs at Brigham Young University, where he received 
degrees in psychology (B.S., l&ST; M.S., 1962 in counseling and 
guidance) . He was born in Richmond, Kentucky, and became a 
member of the Church in 1952. He married Gail Hartley and they 
have three children. Brother Poulos now serves in the bishopric of 
the BYU 6th Ward, BYU 2nd Stake; however he and his family 
reside in Orem 23rd Ward. 



204 



THE INSTRUCTOR 



teach one another words of wisdom; yea, seek ye 
out of the best books words of wisdom; seek learn- 
ing, even by study and also by faith. (Doctrine and 
Covenants 88:118.) 

And set in order the churches, and study and 
learn, and become acquainted with all good books, 
and with languages, tongues, and people. (Doctrine 
and Covenants 90: 15.) 

It is evident that all of us should actively seek 
learning, even by study! 

How To Study 

Actually, "how to study" is about as broad and 
complex a subject as "how to be good." Neither can 
be taught simply nor quickly. Study is a behavior, 
not merely a set of rules. In a sense, everyone who 
has learned to read, write, and spell has learned 
something about how to study, as these are all neces- 
sary tools of communication which relate directly to 
studying. However, study is a skill that can be 
learned, and there is a great deal of research evi- 
dence which indicates that considerable improve- 
ment is possible through the application of specific 
methods. 

Some important prerequisites to effective study 
include a regular study schedule, a quiet place for 
concentration, and motivation to work on some body 
of information in a sustained way. Now the ques- 
tion is how to make the best possible use of the 
time available. There are, of course, many approaches 
to an actual study plan, but there are certainly some 
general rules that might be better applied by all of 
us. Dr. Francis P. Robinson of Ohio State Univer- 
sity has devised a method, based on research, which 
he calls "Survey Q 3 R." This formula represents 
the words Survey, Question, Read, Recite, and Re- 
view. 

Some of Dr. Robinson's points might be adapted 
to the study of self-development, teaching Sunday 
School, upgrading vocational status, as well as for- 
mal learning to attain success in elementary school, 
high school, or college. Most of Dr. Robinson's 
information deals with the study of books, but it can 
be adapted to the study of manuals, class notes, 
pamphlets, articles, etc. 

I. Survey 

A. Long-range survey: 

1. Read the preface and introduction of a book 
to determine what the author purports to do. Then, 
as you continue reading, you can intelligently de- 
termine whether he is communicating properly and 
accomplishing what he set out to do. 

2. Read the Table of Contents — this is the "road 
map" of a book. The answer to a problem may be 



found readily in the early chapters. You then go 
on to another source. 

3. Glance through the book to determine num- 
ber of pages and pictures, size of print, presence of 
graphs and charts, etc. These vary greatly in books. 
If you are aware of these things you can allocate 
your study time to those sources which have the 
specific helps you need. 

4. Develop a research attitude and seek infor- 
mation in addition to that suggested or assigned by 
someone else. Develop a "second-mile" attitude 
about studying as well as in other aspects of be- 
havior. 

B. Short-range survey: 

1. Look over the headings of each chapter to 
determine quickly how that body of information 
will be developed. 

2. Glance over the final summary paragraph (if 
one is available) before starting a chapter. This will 
help you get a total picture of the ideas developed 
in the chapter. 

II. Question 

A. Turn each heading into a question. 

B. Now read the material in an effort to answer 
that question as you read. If you aren't actively 
asking and answering questions while reading, prob- 
ably you aren't concentrating properly. 

C. If the material isn't amply clear, make a note 
either in the book or on a separate piece of paper. 
Study with a pencil in hand. If a point isn't clear 
at the first reading, be sure to get it clarified later, 
either from another reference or from an authority 
in the field. 

D. Refer often to a dictionary, thesaurus, ency- 
clopedia, and other standard references. Presently 
available at little cost are many paperback books 
designed to help improve vocabulary, reading ability, 
spelling, grammar, and other basic tools of study. 
As you improve these basic tools, you improve your 
ability to learn. 

III. Read 

Obviously, if you have been asking and answering 
questions posed in a book, you have been reading. 
A word should be said about some overlap of the 
points in the Survey Q 3 R method. No doubt we 
all apply some of these points when we study. Others 
are sometimes ignored or forgotten. They are mere- 
ly separated and emphasized here so that we will 
learn to focus on them specifically and thereby gain 
some insights to help us study more effectively. 

In this formula the key to reading is to read 

(Concluded on page 210.) 



MAY 1967 



205 



A CHILD 
PRAYED 

by Ottella Tyndall* 

"... Suffer little children to come unto me, and 
forbid them not: for of such is the kingdom of God." 
(Luke 18:16.) 

"And they shall also teach their children to 
pray , . ." (Doctrine and Covenants 68:28.) 

One of life's most important lessons is the lesson 
of prayer. When a child first begins to speak, he 
learns that he can talk to his earthly father and 
receive help. Then he learns he can talk to his Heav- 
enly Father. If he continues to do so through the 
years, the child's faith will grow; and as he meets 
problems, he will not face them alone, no matter 
where he may be. 

Keller's Experience 

Keller^ dug another hole in the pile of dirt he 
had played in while his family stood by Grand- 
father's new grave and talked. The funeral had been 
earlier that day, but Keller and his mother and 
father and some other relatives had returned to the 
cemetery in the late afternoon to pay their last 
respects to his grandfather. 

Four-year-old Keller loved his grandfather, but 
he had become tired just standing so he had wan- 
dered a short distance away and found the dirt 
pile. 

Keller dug another hole. The sun had gone down 
and some of the holes became shadows on the dirt. 
Keller began building a bridge. 

"Keller," his mother called. 

"Yes?" he answered. 

"Go get in the car. We're leaving in a few min- 
utes." 

"Okay." 

Keller worked on his bridge, mounding up the 



(For Course 1, lessons of July 16 to 30. "We Talk To Heavenly 
Father," "We Pray Alone," and "We Pray with Other People"; for 
Course la, lessons of May 14 and 21, "Heavenly Father Wants Us To 
Talk to Him" and "We Pray at Home"; for Course 3, lesson of July 
2, "We Are Commanded To Pray"; for Course 7, lesson of May 28, 
"Ask, And It Shall Be Given You"; and of general interest.) 

*Ottella W. Tyndall teaches child development and is head teach- 
er in the laboratory for preschool children at Brigham Young Uni- 
versity. She obtained her B.S. and M.S. degrees from BYU. She is 
a member of the National and Utah Associations of Nursery Edu- 
cation. Sister Tyndall and her husband, Clarence, are parents of 
three children. They live in Oak Hills 4th Ward, East Sharon (Utah) 
stake. 

iReller is the son of Verl and Vivian Clark, Oak Hills 4th Ward, 
East Sharon Stake, Provo, Utah. 




Keller knelt beside Grandfather's grave and prayed. 

dirt and packing it level, sloping the sides and mak- 
ing the end smooth off into a neat dip. 

Keller Ustened; he didn't hear voices anymore. 
It was getting dark so he gave his bridge a few more 
pats and then got up and walked over to Grand- 
father's grave. No one was there. Mother was gone, 
Father was gone, everyone else was gone. Keller 
caUed loudly, "Mother!" 



206 



THE INSTR UCTOR 



He ran to where the car had been parked. The 
car was gone! His family had left and he was alone 
in the cemetery. Mother had told him to get in the 
car, but he had not obeyed her; and now he was 
alone. He called again, "Mother!" 

What could he do? He walked back to Grand- 
father's grave. Darkness crowded around him. Keller 
began to cry. He was scared, but he knew what 
his mother and father did at home when they need- 
ed help and they didn't know what to do. Keller 
dropped to his knees by the graveside and prayed. 

"Dear Heavenly Father, please help me. Please 
let my Mother think where I am and come and get 
me. In Jesus' name. Amen." 

After he prayed, Keller huddled by the grave, 
close to his grandfather. He thought he heard a coy- 
ote howl. He yelled as loud as he could, "Mother!" 
Then he waited. He knew his Heavenly Father was 
near and would take care of everything because his 
Heavenly Father loved him; and he knew his grand- 
father loved him, so he would stay close beside 
Grandfather until Mother came. 

Then Keller heard the car stop. He jumped up 
and ran. Daddy scooped him up in his arms. "I love 
you, Daddy," Keller cried in relief. "And I'll do 
what you say all the rest of my life." 

When they were in the car on the way home and 
Keller was curled up safe in his mother's lap, he 
said, "I prayed you would think where I was." 

"And I did, Keller," Mother said. "It came to 
me just like a flash that you were in the cemetery." 

Keller smiled, "Our Heavenly Father always helps 
us when we need Him and ask Him, doesn't He?" 

To the Teacher 

Too frequently adults do the talking and telling 
during a lesson presentation and expect children to 
listen. Children do need to listen but they also need 
to converse and clarify their thinking. I would hke to 
share with you a conversation I had with Keller 
about prayer and this experience. 

"Keller, why do we pray to our Heavenly Father?" 

"Because He gave us so many things." 

"What did He give you?" 

"Flowers, food, crops." 

"Before you were born you lived with our Heav- 
enly Father. We all lived with our Heavenly Father. 
When you came to Hve with your father and mother, 
you could not see your Heavenly Father any more. 
But He still loves you. He wants you to talk to 
Him. How do you talk to Him?" 

"When we pray." 

"How do you begin a prayer?" 



"You say, 'Our Dear Heavenly Father, thank 
you for all the things you have done for me.' " 

"Then what do you say?" 

"You pray that you will be safe your whole life 
and never do anything wrong your whole life." 

"How do you end a prayer?" 

"In Jesus' name. Amen." 

Re-living Keller's Experience: 

"What did you do when you found you were 
left at the cemetery?" 

"I kind of cried, and then I used my brain and 
prayed that my mother would think where I was." 

"Were you afraid?" 

"I just wanted my mother. It got real dark and 
I was scared. I'm scared when I'm alone and I im- 
agine things like coyotes barking." 

"Did you think your Mother would come?" 

"Yes, I did." 

"How did you feel after you had prayed and 
asked for our Heavenly Father's help?" 

"Just like I'd been taken care of and nothing 
can hurt you. I feel like He was just next to me 
and listening to me." 

"Why did you think our Heavenly Father could 
help you?" 

"Because He has power to do it." 

Teacher's Comment: 

Our Heavenly Father wants us to pray to Him be- 
cause He loves us and He wants to help us. We have 
a good feeling inside of us when we pray. We know 
our Heavenly Father will hear our prayers. Some- 
times He does not answer our prayers in the 
way we want Him to, but answers them in a way 
He knows is best for us. 

The Story, Continued: 

"After you got through praying, what happened?" 

"I yelled one more time and here came my 
mother and father in the car." 

"How did you feel when you saw your mother 
and daddy?" 

"I feeled sorry for being naughty." 

"How had you been naughty?" 

"My mother told me to get in the car because 
we were going home in a few minutes and I didn't. 
I just played in a dirt pile." 

"What did you say when you saw your father 
and mother?" 

"I love you. I will do what you say all the rest 
of my life." 

"Why do you think your mother knew where 
you were?" 

{Concluded on page 210.) 



MAY 1967 



207 



Titles and Dates of Sunday School Lessons by Courses 

3rd Quarter 1967 



COURSE OF 
STUDY-! 967 


Course No. 1 : 

A Gospel 

of Love 


Course No. la: 

Beginnings of 

Religious Praise 


Course No. 3: 

Growing In 

the Gospel 

Part II 


Course No. 5: 

Living Our 
Religion, Part II 


Course No. 7: 

History of the 

Church for 

Children 


Course No. 9: 

Scripture Lessons 

in Leadei-^ip 


APPROXIMATE 
AGES-1967 


Nursery 
3 


Advanced Nursery 
4 


Kindergarten 
5, 6 


Primary 
7. 8 


9, 10 


11, 12 


Date of Lesson 
JULY 2 


1 Think of 
Jesus 

(32) 


Pres. David O. 
McKay 

(34) 


We Are 

Commanded 

To Pray 

(30) 


Pore 
in Heart 

(35) 


Pioneer Life 
in Utah 

(35) 


A Leader Is 

Against Evil 

(29) 


JULY 9 


1 Put Things 
Where They Be- 
long at Sunday 

School (33) 


Prophet Elijah 

Nooh and 

the Great Rain 

(35, 36) 


We Are 

Commanded 

To Be Reverent 

(31) 


Am 1 

My Brother's 

Keeper? 

Tolerance 

Peacemakers 

(36, 37, 38) 


What It Means 
To Be a Pioneer 

The Pioneers 

in Your Family 

(36, 37) 


A Leader Has 

Righteous Friends 

(30) 


JULY 16 


We Talk to 

Heavenly 

Father 

(34) 


David, the 

Shepherd Boy 

David Becomes a 

Great King 

(37, 38) 


We Keep the 
Sabbath Day 

Holy 

(32) 


Peace Is a 

Personal 
Problem 

(39) 


Making the 

Church Stronger 

(38) 


A Leader 

Repents 

(31) 


JULY 23 


We Pray Alone 

We Pray with 

Other People 

(35, 36) 


Baby Moses 
Was Protected 

Moses, a 

Great Leader 

(39, 40) 


The Word 
of Wisdom 

(33) 


Persecution 

(40, 41) 


Prophets 

Direct the 

Church 

(39) 


A Leader Seeks 

the Kingdom 

of God 

(33) 


JULY 30 


We Pray at 
Sunday School 

(37) 


We Learn 
How To Live 

(41) 


We Pay 
Tithing 

(34) 


Dare To 
Do Right 

(42) 


Brigham Young, 

the Second 

President 

(40) 


A Leader 

Produces 

Good Fruits 

(34) 


AUGUST 6 


We Are Kind to 

Each Other at Home 

We Are Learning 

To Be a Kind 

Brother or Sister 

(38, 39) 


Our Families 

Our Friends 

and Neighbors 

(42, 43) 


Forgiveness 
(38) 


Courage To 

Do Right 

Courage of 

Daniel 

(43, 44) 


John Taylor 
Wilford Woodruff 

(41, 42) 


A Leader 

Perseveres in 

Doing Right 

(35) 


AUGUST 13 


Neighbors Should 

Be Kind to 

Each Other 

(41) 


Our Animal 

Friends 

We Share 

with Others 

(44, 45) 


The First 

Presidency 

The Church Has 

Twelve Apostles 

(39, 40) 


Nephi Was 

Blessed 

"Ye Shall Have 

Great Joy" 

(46, 47) 


Lorenzo Snow 

Joseph F. Smith 

(43, 44) 


A Leader Honors 

His Parents 

(36) 


AUGUST 20 


We Are 

Learning To Be 

Kind Everywhere 

(42) 


Our Many Helpers 

Thanks to Our 

Heavenly Father 

(46, 47) 


The Sacrament 

Is in 
Remembrance 
of Jesus (50) 


The Courage of 

Prophel 

Joseph Smith 

(48) 


Heber J. Grant 

George Albert 

Smith 

{45, 46) 


Review 

(37) 


AUGUST 27 


People Are 

Kind to Us at 

Sunday School 

(43) 


We Care. 

For Ourselves 

Right Choices 

We Grow Bigger 

(48, 49, 50) 


t Would Follow 

in His 

Footsteps 

(52) 


"Ye Are the 

Salt of 
the Earth" 

(49) 


David O. McKay 

Our General 

Authorities 

(47, 48) 


A Leader 

Seeks the Lord 

(38) 


SEPTEMBER 3 
SEPTEMBER 10 




New Course 


js will begin he 
in The Instrud 


re— Chart will b 
tor, July, 1967 


e published 





SEPTEMBER 17 



SEPTEMBER 24 



Numbers in parentheses are manual lesson numbers. 

Note to teachers in Northern Hemisphere: In some courses lessons 
have been combined, and in others, lessons have been omitted so 
that all courses will be completed by the end of August, 1967. 



208 



THE INSTR UCTOR 



Titles and Dates of Sunday School Lessons by Courses 



3rd Quarter 1967 



Course No. 11: 

History of the 

Restored Church 


Course No. 13: 

Principles of the 

Restored Church 

at Work 


Course No. 15: 

Life in 
Ancient America 


Course No. 19: 

The Articles 

of Faith 


Course No. 23: 
Teaching 

the 
Gospel 


Course No. 25: 

Gospel Living 

in the Home 


Course No. 27: 

The Gospel in the 

Service of Man 


Course No. 29: 

A Marvelous 

Work and 

a Wonder 


13, 14 


15, 16 


17, 18 


19, 20, 21, 22 


Preservice 
Teachers- 
Adults 


Family 
Relations- 
Adults 


Gospel Doctrine 
Adults 


Gospel 
Essentials- 
Adults 


Pioneer Trail 

Blazing 

Pony Express 

Over and Stage 

and Telegraph 

(38, 39) 


Helps to 
Safety and 
Happiness 

(37) 


Alma 

and Amuiek 

(27) 


The Book 
of Mormon 
(Continued) 

(26) 


i 

3 
d 

u> 

_c 

"c 

1 
1 

.2 

o> 

c 

i 

8 

M 

c 
o 
a. 

Q. 

E 
8 

-0 

c 
□ 

V) 

1 

s 

o 

:£ 

Ol 

c 

'%Z 

3 

a 


Towards 

Spiritual 

Maturity 

(33) 


Marriage and 
the Family 

(21) 


True Church, 

A Missionary 

Church 

(27) 


United Order 
(40) 


Review 
(38) 


Mission 

to the 

Lamanites 

(28) 


Revelation 
(27) 


Free Agency 

and Choice 

(34) 


The Church 

and State 

(22) 


A Voice 

of Warning 

(28) 


Welfare Plan 
(41) 


Detours 

(39) 


Mission 

to the 

Zoramites 

(29) 


Dispersion and 

Gathering of 

Israel— Zion, 

Christ's Reign 

on Earth 

(28) 


Tests and 
Trials 

(35) 


Man and 

Nature 

(23) 


His 

Many 

Mansions 

(29) 


Early Church 

Schools 

Educational Ideas 

of Brighom Young 

(42, 43) 


Testimony 
(40, 41, 42) 


Helaman 
(30) 


The Resurrection 
(29) 


Review 


Review 


Road to 

Salvation and 

Exaltation 

(30) 


Present Program 

of the Church 

(44) 


Prayer 
Prayer and 
Testimony 

(43, 44) 


Shiblon 
(31) 


Religious Liberty 

and Toleration 

(30) 


Man: Created 

and Creator 

(36) 


Caring for 

the Body 

(24) 


Whence 

Cometh 

Man? 

(31) 


Church 

Auxiliaries 

(45) 


Responsibility 
(45) 


Corianton 
(32) 


Submission to 

Secular Authority 

(31) 


Hidden 

Treasure 

(37) 


The Inner 
Life 
(25) 


Foreordination 
(32) 


Social Program 

of the Church 

(46) 


Paying the 
Bills 
(46) 


Moroni 

vs. 

Zarahemnah 

(33) 


Practical Religion 

— Home and 

Marriage 

(32) 


Joy Comes 

through 

Obedience 

(38) 


Daily 

Work 

(26) 


Sons and 

Daughters 

of God 

(33) 


Expansion of 

Mormonism 

Effects of 

Expansion 

(47, 48) 


Paying the 

Bills 
(Continued) 

(47) 


Moroni 

vs. 

Amalickiah 

(34) 


Practical Religion 

— Spirituality 

(33) 


Priorities 

and 
Emphases 

(39) 


Completion of 

the Plan 

(27) 


Why Is 

Man Here? 

(34) 


Review 
(49) 


My Brother's 

Keeper 

(48) 


Moroni 

vs. 

Ammoron 

(35) 


Practical Religion 

—Benevolence of 

the Church 

(34) 


The Personal 

Commitment 

(40) 


Review 


Marriage and 

Family 

Relationships 

(35) 



MAY 1967 



209 



EVEN BY STUDY' 



{Concluded from page 205.) 



actively! Make the simple ink marks on paper come 
alive. This often takes a great deal of concerted 
effort. But remember, most new information can be 
made vital if related to other experiences in your 
repertoire of knowledge. It is this process of asso- 
ciation of new information to known ideas that 
makes studying a dynamic process. 

IV. Recite 

There are tWo concepts to keep in mind here: 

A. Repetition tends to enhance recall. The more 
material is repeated, the more likely it is to be re- 
membered. For example, we seldom forget our 
names simply because we have repeated them so 
often — we have overleamed them. 

B. Bringing more than one of the senses to bear 
in the learning situation often enhances remember- 
ing. For example, in learning a long list of words, 
it may help your recall to look (sight) away from 
the book and then write (touch) the words on the 
board as you repeat them out loud (sound). 

If the material is repeated often enough using 
the various senses, you will certainly increase the 
probability for remembering, in terms of both quan- 



tity and quality. This is sometimes accomplished 
by studying in small groups. 

V. Review 

To "re-view" means to look at something again. 
Too often we try to understand and remember at 
the same time. Research has demonstrated that it 
is better to distribute than to mass study time. In 
other words, if you have eight hours to devote to 
a given subject, it is better to space this in four 
two-hour periods than in one eight-hour period. This 
means that for maximum results you should not 
"cram" — either for a test or for teaching a Sunday 
School class. 

A great deal has been written about the subject 
of "How to Study." Articles, pamphlets, and text- 
books are available. Formal courses are offered by 
public school adult education programs and by col- 
leges and universities. 

The more of these helps we use, the more we 
will learn about the development of study skills 
. . . "even by study!" 



Library Pile Reference: LEARNING. 



A CHILD PRAYED (Concluded from page 207.) 

"Because I prayed. My mother said it came to 
her just like a flash where I was." 

Teacher's Comment: 

There are many times that we can pray to our 
Heavenly Father and ask Him to help us. We can 
ask for His help when we are lost or afraid, as 
you did. When someone is sick we can pray to our 
Heavenly Father to bless him. We can pray to Him 
in Sunday School or Primary. We can pray to Him 
at night and in the morning and thank Him for the 
things He gives us and ask Him to protect us. We 
pray to Him before we eat each meal and thank 
Him for our food and ask Him to bless it. Isn't it 
good to know, when you are alone and no one else 
is around, that you can pray to our Heavenly Father 
and He will help you? 

"It seems like when you pray to our Heavenly 
Father He's just right next to you." 

"Do you think our Heavenly Father is very far 
away from us?" 

"No, I think He's right close to me, but He's 
far away." 

"Can He be far away and still help us?" 

"Yes, He knows everything. He has so much 



power. And He will help us wherever we are, because 
He loves us very much." 

Conclusion 

Keller was given a chance to express himself and 
was helped to clarify his thinking about prayer. His 
strong desire to pray can be attributed to the' atmos- 
phere of his home. Worshipful experiences in Sun- 
day School helped him express himself through 
prayer. Receiving blessings for which he has prayed 
has developed a faith in God, giving him a sense of 
security which will sustain him throughout his life. 
Keller has learned the meaning of the following lines: 

/ love my Heav'nly Father, 
Tho' Him I cannot see, 
But every time I pray to Him, 
Then He is near to me. 

And He will gladly help me, 
In all my work or play, 
If I will but remember, 
To ask Him every day.^ 



^Course 1 Sunday School Manual, A Gospel of Love; Deseret 
Sunday School Union, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1961; page 233. 
Library File Reference : PRAYER. 



210 



THE I NSTR UCTOR 



Ik Wmdis 0f Jem 



by Robert J. Matthews 



The power to work miracles is one of the gifts of 
the Spirit. Jesus* miracles constitute a major ele- 
ment of His ministry. 

The Four Gospels contain accounts of Jesus' 
miracles but not many of His comments concerning 
them. However, available references are informative: 

"... I cast out devils by the Spirit of God." 
(Matthew 12:28.) 

Also: "... I with the finger of God cast out 
devils." (Luke 11:20.) 

Jesus said He had "done among them the works 
which none other man did" (apparently referring to 
His miracles). (See John 3:2; 7:31; 15:24.) Jesus 
apparently regarded His miracles as part of the evi- 
dence of Hid divine calling, for when the messengers 
from John the Baptist came asking if He were the 
one they were to look for; He repUed: ". . . the blind 
see, the lame walk, the lepers are cleansed, the deaf 
hear, the dead are raised. . . ." (Luke 7:20-22.) 

Characteristics of Jesus' Miracles 

Jesus' miracles show certain definite character- 
istics in exact harmony with His divinity: 

1. They had a high moral purpose. They were 
always beneficent and compassionate and 
done to further the purposes of the Father. 

2. They were never for a selfish purpose, as 
evidenced by Jesus' refusal to turn stones 
into bread (Matthew 4:3-4), or to save Him- 
self from death (Matthew 26:53), or to come 
down from the cross (Mark 15:29-32). Yet 
He was willing to turn water into wine, to 
multiply a few fishes and loaves to feed thou- 
sands, and to do any number of things for 
other people. 

3. They do not appear to be pre-planned or pre- 
meditated, but seem to arise out of the situ- 
ation at hand. 

It is also evident that where faith was lacking, 
great miracles could not be manifest. At Nazareth 
"he could ... do no mighty work, save that he laid 
his hands upon a few sick folk, and healed them. 

(For Course 5, lessons of June 11 and July 30, "Heavenly Father 
and Jesus Christ" and "Dare To Do Right"; for Course 7, lesson of 
May 28, "Ask and It Shall Be Given You"; for Course 9, lesson of 
July 30, "A Leader Produces Good Fruit"; for Course 15, lesson of 
July 2, "Alma and Amulek"; for Course 19, lesson of May 28 "Spiri- 
tual Gifts"; for Course 27, lessons of May 7 and July 16, "Priesthood" 
and "Man and Nature"; and of general interest.) 

MAY 1967 



And he marvelled because of their unbelief. . . ." 
(Mark 6:5-6. See also 3 Nephi 19:35, 36.) 

Methods of Healing 

1. The use of materials. 

The Gospels do not record any instances of Jesus 
using medicines, not even juices of herbs or grasses. 

Jesus used spittle in healing (Mark 7:33; 8:23); 
and also clay made with spittle (John 9:6); and 
perhaps oil. It is nowhere stated that Jesus used 
oil in healing, but the disciples did (Mark 6:13; 
James 5:14-15) under His direction. 

2. Touching and laying on of hands. 

Jesus touched a leper (Matthew 8:3), the hand 
of Peter's mother-in-law (Matthew 8:15), the eyes 
of blind men (Matthew 9:29; 20:34), the tongue 
of the deaf and dumb man (Mark 7:33), and 
the servant's ear (Luke 22:51). He put His finger 
in the ears of the deaf man (Mark 7:33). 

3. By the "word." 

It is frequently mentioned that Jesus healed by 
the "word." Although often He was near enough 
to touch the affHcted persons, it is not always ex- 
pressly stated that He always had physical contact 
with them. Some healings were so far distant from 
His person that no physical contact was possible. 
(See Matthew 8:5-13.) These were done by His 
word only. 

4. Permanency. 

There is no record of Jesus experiencing a fail- 
ure (which would be unthinkable and impossible), 
nor any instance of a healing being temporary. The 
scriptures indicate His healings to be quite imme- 
diate, complete, and permanent (assuming that the 
subjects remained faithful after the event) . 

Speaking Directly to the Elements 

In performing miracles Jesus exercised the power 
He held. He spoke directly to the elements or to 
the person involved, rather than asking the Father 
to accomplish the act. He likewise spoke directly 
to the evil spirits, commanding them to "come out." 
(Mark 1:25.) 

(Concluded on following page.) 



211 



THE MIRACLES OF JESUS (Concluded from preceding page.) 



When discoursing upon faith, Jesus said that 
one may "say unto this mountain, Remove hence . . . 
and it shall remove." (Matthew 17:20.) When still- 
ing the tempest, He "rebuked the wind, and said 
unto the sea, Peace, be still." (Mark 4:39.) 

Purpose of Miracles 

The Prophet Joseph Smith had a key for under- 
standing the scriptures. Said he: 

/ have a key by which I understand the scrip- 
tures. I enquire, what was the question which drew 
out the answer. . . . To ascertain its meaning, we 
must dig up the root and ascertain what it was that 
drew the saying out of Jesus.^ 

Although the Prophet said this in relation to par- 
ables, its application is equally useful in understand- 
ing the purpose of the miracles. Since there are 
several different kinds of miracles, it follows that 
there would be more than one purpose involved at 
different times. 

The basic purpose for Jesus* miracles would seem 
to be His compassion and love for mankind. Especial- 
ly in healings and raising the dead do we find His 
love and compassion manifest. (Matthew 14:14; 
Luke 7:13-15.) Other types of miracles perhaps were 
prompted by practical considerations, even by a de- 
sire to teach: 

1. To give evidence of His divine mission and power, 
so that the honest in heart would believe, and 
the believers would be strengthened. (Matthew 

. 9:5; 11:2-6; John 2:11; 3:2; 4:53; 9:3-4; 11: 
47-48; 14:10-11.) 

2. To teach His disciples that He was Master of 
the elements on the land, on the sea, in the air, 
and also of the unseen world. 

a. He turned water into wine (John 2:1-11), 
and twice miraculously provided great quan- 
tities of food. (Matthew 14:14-21; 15:29-39.) 

b. He walked on the water (Matthew 14:25-26) 
and three times performed miracles involving 
live fish of the sea. (Matthew 17:24-47; Luke 
5:1-11; John 21:1-U.) 

c. He calmed the storm. (Mark 4:35-41.) 

d. He cast out devils and controlled them at His 
will. (Mar^ 1:23-27; 9:17.) 

e. He read men's innermost thoughts. (Matthew 
12:25; Luke 5:22; 6:8; 9:47; 11:17-27.) 

3. To demonstrate that He had power over death. 
(Luke 8:41-56; 7:11-15; John 11:1-45.) 

4. To demonstrate His ability to heal the soul as 
well as the body. (Mark 2:1-12.) 



^Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith, compiled by Joseph 
Fielding Smith; Deseret Book Company, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1958; 
pages 276, 277. 



5. To expose the narrow, contracted, self-righteous 
views of the scribes, Pharisees, and Sadducees. 
(Mark 3:1-6; Luke 13:10-17; 14:1-6.) * 

6. To cause men to realize their spiritual infirmities 
and to raise their thoughts to higher truths. (Mat- 
thew 21:18-21; Mark 2:1-11.) * 

True Faith and Miracles 

It is important to observe that while miracles 
may strengthen the faith of those who already be- 
lieve, they do not serve to create faith in unbelievers. 
Jesus emphatically refused to give the Pharisees a 
sign from heaven to satisfy their curiosity, and told 
them that it was "an evil and adulterous generation" 
that required a sign. (Matthew 12:38-39; Mark 
8:11-21; Luke 11:16, 29.) Likewise, Herod "hoped 
to have seen some miracle done by him . . . but he 
answered him nothing." (Luke 23:8-9.) 

Far from converting unbelievers, the miracles 
Jesus performed often made His enemies all the ^ 
more antagonistic and prompted them to seek op- m^ 
portunity to destroy Him. (See Mark 3:1-6; Luke 
13:10-17; John 11:46-48.) 

Those ". . . that seeketh signs shall see signs, 
but not unto salvation. . . . Faith cometh not by 
signs, but signs follow those that believe." (Doctrine 
and Covenants 63:7-12.) Those who have to be con- 
verted by miracles probably will require additional 
miracles to maintain their faith. 

Jesus Among the Nephites 

During His ministry to the Nephites Jesus asked 
them to bring their sick and afflicted to Him and 
He would heal them. Nephi specifically listed the 
lame, blind, halt, maimed, leprous, withered, deaf, 
and "afflicted in any manner."' When they were 
brought, Jesus healed every one of them (including 
those who were dumb — not specifically stated in the 
first category) . He stated that His desire was moti- 
vated by His compassion and their faith. (3 Nephi 
17:29.) Jesus said, "So great faith have I never seen 
among all the Jews; wherefore I could not show unto 
them so great miracles, because of their unbelief." 
(3 Nephi 19:35. Compare with Mark 6:5-6.) 

Conclusion 

Without miracles, the Gospel would be an in- 
complete history, and it would be totally inadequate 
to save the souls of men. Members of The Church 
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints have the tools 
for correctly understanding the miracles contained in 
the Gospel record and for seeing their essential place 
in the Gospel of Jesus Christ. 



Library File Reference: JESUS CHRIST— MIRACLES. 



212 



TH E ! NSTRUCTOR 




isM- 



HEALINGS 

Palsy 

Issue of blood 

Fever 

Leprosy 

Blindness 

Withered hand 

Impotent man 

Malchus' ear 

Dumbness 

Dropsy 

Speech impediment 

Deafness 
Diseases 



Ik Mimlts oi Jesus 





MIRACLES OF NATURE 

Calming a storm 
Changing water into wine 
Feeding 4000 
Draught of fishes 
Fig tree cursed 
Walking on water 
Feeding 5000 
Money in fish's mouth 
Second draught of fishes 




THE DEAD RAISED 

Jarius' daughter 
Son of widow of Nain 
Lazarus 

OTHERS 

Passing in crowd unseen 
Forgiving sin 
Reading men's thoughts 
Resurrection from dead 
Casting out devils 




■KS£%3:&t>l^M>^^;^ ^ 




15. 
16. 



Peter's mother-in-law healed of a 
fever. (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 4.) 

A leper healed. (Matthew 8:1-4.) 

Two blind men healed. (Matthew 
9:27-31.) 

Deaf person with speech impedi- 
ment healed. (Mark 7:32-37.) 

Blind man healed. (Mark 8:22-26.) 

Issue cff blood healed — ^touched his 
garment. (Matthew 9:20-27.) 

Man born blind, healed. (John 9: 
1-7.) 

Woman with eighteen-year infirmity 
healed. (Luke 13:11-13.) 

Two blind men healed. (Matthew 
20:29-34.) 

Malchus' ear healed. (Luke 22:50, 
51.) 

Man healed of palsy. (Matthew 9: 
2-8.) 

Impotent man healed at pool of 
Bethsaida. (John 5:2-9.) 

A man's withered hand healed, 
(Luke 6:6-10.) 

Man with dropsy healed. (Luke 14: 
1-4.) 

Ten lepers healed. (Luke 17:11-19.) 

Bartimaeus healed of blindness. 
(Mark 10:47-52.) 



2. 



SCRIPTURE REFERENCES 



17. Nobleman's son healed. (John 4: 
46-54.) 

18. Centurion's servant healed of palsy. 
(Matthew 8:5-13.) 

19. All that were diseased in the land 
of Gennesaret were healed. (Mat- 
thew 14:34-36.) 

20. Multitudes brought the lame, blind, 
dumb, maimed, and many others 
and Jesus healed them. (Matthew 
15:29-31.) 

21. Many that were diseased were 
healed. (Mark 1:32-34.) 



MIRACLES OF NATURE 2. 

1. Jesus walks on the sea. (Matthew 3. 
14:24-33.) 

2. Five thousand fed. (Matthew 14: 4. 
14-21.) 

3. Four thousand fed. (Matthew 15: 
29-38.) 5. 

4. Changed water into wine. (John 2: 6. 
1-11.) 

5. Draught of fishes provided. (Luke 7. 
5:1-11.) 

6. Fig tree cursed. (Matthew 21:18, 8. 
19.) 

7. Second draught of fishes. (John 9. 
21:1-8.) 

8. The storm calmed. (Matthew 8:23- 10. 
27.) 




THE DEAD RAISED 

Jarius' daughter raised. (Matthew 
14:24-33.) 

Restored life to son of widow of 
Nain. (Luke 7:11-17.) 

Lazarus raised from the dead. 
(John 11:43, 44.) 



OTHERS 

A demoniac child healed. (Matthew 
17:18.) 

Jesus passed unseen through hos- 
tile crowd. (Luke 4:28-30.) 

An unclean spirit cast out. (Mark 
1:21-28,) 

Devils cast out of two Gadarene 
demoniacs. (Matthew 8:28-34; Mark 
5:1-20; Luke 8:6-29.) 

A devil cast out. (Luke 11:14.) 

Money in fish's mouth. (Matthew 
17:24-27.) 

A blind and dumb demoniac healed. 
(Matthew 12:22, 23.) 

Seven devils cast out of Mary Mag- 
dalene. (Mark 16:9.) 

A palsied man forgiven of sin. 
(Mark 2:8, 9.) 

Jesus is risen. (Matthew 28:6-10.) 



THE INSTRUCTOR MAY 1967 



Compiled by Robert J. Matthews. 



Second Class Postage Paid 
at Salt Lake City, Utah 



MOST KINGLY GIFT 



AIRLINE STEWARDESS: 



"NOW STEP OUTSIDE AND CARE ABOUT OTHERS.' 



Our home was burglarized not 
long ago. It happened in broad 
daylight, while all were away. The 
thief took our color television set, 
the stereo, our son's transistor 
radio, and some jewelry. 

Fortunately, insurance covered 
the stolen items. 

But there was a real loss to me 
in the contents of a black leather 
case about the size of a college 
dictionary. The contents were per- 
sonal treasures: A Boy Scout med- 
al or two, a small school pin, a 
couple of college fraternity badges, 
a watch fob won in a tennis tour- 
nament years ago, a service club 
lapel pin, a souvenir medallion 
from England, a favorite boyhood 
marble with rings of orange, brown 
and white, and other prized me- 
mentos. 

It was a chilling thought to real- 
ize that probably none of these 
small trophies which had been 
carefully guarded through the 
years could ever be regained. 

The loss caused me to think: 
"What are my greatest treasures?" 

What are yours? 

When you list them all, unques- 
tionably your greatest possession 
is you yourself. 

One of recorded history's most 
momentous meetings occurred on 
"an exceedingly high mountain." 
There Moses talked face to face 
with God. The Lord showed Moses 
the earth, "and there was not a 
particle of it which he did not be- 
hold."^ God showed him the peo- 

(For Course 9, lessons of May 21 and July 
30, "A Leader Shares" and "A Leader Pro- 
duces Good Fruits"; for Course 13, lesson of 
July 16, "Detours"; for Course 25, lessons of 
June 18 and July 30, "Maturing the Emo- 
tions" and "Man: Created and Creator"; for 
Course 27, lesson of July 30, "Caring for the 
Body"; for Course 29, lessons of June 4 and 
July 23, "Candidates for Godhood" and "Road 
to Salvation and Exaltation"; and of general 
interest.) 

^Moses 1 :27. 



pie of the earth, "and there was 
not a soul which he beheld not."^ 
Then the Lord said: "For behold, 
this is my work and my glory — 
to bring to pass the immortality 
and eternal life of man."^ 

The Lord did not tell Moses 
that His supreme work was to 
build His kingdom on earth. His 
work and His glory was to exalt 
man. That means you. 

Jesus repeatedly said that His 
mission was to make life more 
abundant for the individual. 
Speaking to the eleven after their 
memorable last supper. He said, 
"He that believeth on me, the 
works that I do shall he do also."* 
Jesus aimed to make of every man 
and woman something greater. 

If you yourself are your greatest 
possession, then you should know 
yourself better than all else that 
you own. 

Tonight I have been reading a 
challenging article, "The Power to 
See Ourselves," by Paul J. Brown- 
er, a consulting psychologist to 
management. The article appears 
in the book, How Successful Exe- 
cutives Handle People, published 
by Harvard University.'^ The ar- 
ticle suggests that to be more ef- 
fective, to be happier, every man 
should continue to examine him- 
self. Every man changes with new 
experiences, with varying duties, 
and with new situations. A man is, 
or should be, different when he 
becomes a sales manager after be- 
ing a salesman; a principal, after 
serving as a teacher. Growth comes 
through seeing yourself as what 

2Moses 1:28. 

«Moses 1:39. 

*John 14:12. 

^Contents of book copyrighted by president 
and fellows of Harvard College, Cambridge, 
Mass., 1951-1965. 




Art by Dale Kilbourn. 

you may become and then striv- 
ing toward that goal. 

"I used to think it was awful to 
love yourself," an esteemed neigh- 
bor woman recently said. "I don't 
any more. I love and care about 
myself. When I do, I can walk out 
into the world feeling good with 
myself, and I lose myself in trying 
to serve others." 

She told how she had learned 
some of this power of knowing and 
loving herself through her daugh- 
ter, an airline stewardess. "She 
always spends a long time primp- 
ing. Then she will bounce out of 
her room saying cheerily, 'All right, 
Linda, you've given yourself a lot 
of attention. Now step outside and 
care about others.' " 

Two management consultants, 
Joe Batten and Leonard C. Hud- 
son, are coauthors of an article, 
"How to Live a Fuller Life."« They 
stress that life becomes richer, 
more abundant, as we give to 
others that which is most precious 
— ourselves. It is a bigger, strong- 
er person who can each day resolve 
to give a little of himself to every- 
one he meets, the authors suggest. 

Life's greatest prize is not in a 
little black leather case nor in a 
bank deposit box. It is in you. 
Every man needs to consider him- 
self a king, and then keep giving 
away the most kingly of gifts — 
himself. — Wendell J, Ashton. 



^Nation's Bvsiness, February, 1967, pages 
78-80. 
Library File Reference: SERVICE.